deindustrialization

(redirected from deindustrialised)
Also found in: Dictionary, Financial.

deindustrialization

the process in which a previously industrialized or industrializing economy, or society, or region, reverts partly or wholly to a preindustrialized form. This process may occur as the outcome of international economic competition (see DEPENDENCY THEORY, also IMPERIALISM).

To some degree, the process may also occur within developed societies (e.g. the recent regional decline of manufacturing industries such as textiles or shipbuilding in parts of Western Europe). Nor is it simply a recent phenomenon. Rather, it can be seen as a ‘normal’ aspect of the workings of capitalism on an international stage at all phases of its development. According to WALLERSTEIN (1974), societies as different as Poland and India are examples of economies which underwent periods of deindustrialization in the course of the development of the world economy.

Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
This paper aims to investigate how the current brownfield regeneration practice in Europe's deindustrialised cities leads to the creation of sustainable and high quality developments, assisting in the urban renaissance.
See also Robert Summerby-Murray, "Interpreting Deindustrialised Landscapes of Atlantic Canada: Memory and Industrial Heritage in Sackville, New Brunswick," Canadian Geographer 46, no.
'The lack of graduate retention combined with the poor level of skills means it is very difficult for enterprise to survive in the area.' The report adds: 'Skills poverty is catastrophic in deindustrialised Britain.
The article notes the transition of industry from its role as a beacon of economic progress in the late 19th and early 20th centuries towards a more recent romanticised and overly-sanitised role in the evolution of deindustrialised landscapes.
The area of east Manchester is enormous -- over 1,000 hectares, some one-fifth of the whole city, comprising the sad detritus of a deindustrialised wasteland.
One Nation's dystopia envisions a globalised, deindustrialised, rurally depressed society with high unemployment and high levels of foreign ownership.
The "intersection of national origin, economic exclusion and spatial segregation" has also captured the attention of French researchers who have established that immigrants are disproportionately unemployed and overwhelmingly concentrated in deindustrialised, low income suburban peri-pheries (Silver 1993).
The Commission of the European Community exhibited a far more interventionist stance in relation to the economic regeneration of deindustrialised local economies than did the British central government in recent years.
It states that median incomes in Wales are 35% lower than in London and the South East, adding: "For people in deindustrialised areas and declining communities there has been little sign of economic recovery."
A 1979 album sleeve by Judas Priest comes with the assertion that heavy metal bands "offered a new form of masculinity to the deindustrialised youth of the UK".
A slick and rampant financial sector, supercharged by the liberating effects of 'light touch' regulation, would create tax receipts that could be diverted through the bountiful effects of increasing spending on health and education, and increasing the size of the public sector workforce, to those floundering, deindustrialised sections of the country that had not benefitted from the boom.
Given the spatial concentration of employment patterns, this can create major problems in terms of deindustrialised neighbourhoods, creating ingrained inequalities within States.