deindustrialization


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deindustrialization

the process in which a previously industrialized or industrializing economy, or society, or region, reverts partly or wholly to a preindustrialized form. This process may occur as the outcome of international economic competition (see DEPENDENCY THEORY, also IMPERIALISM).

To some degree, the process may also occur within developed societies (e.g. the recent regional decline of manufacturing industries such as textiles or shipbuilding in parts of Western Europe). Nor is it simply a recent phenomenon. Rather, it can be seen as a ‘normal’ aspect of the workings of capitalism on an international stage at all phases of its development. According to WALLERSTEIN (1974), societies as different as Poland and India are examples of economies which underwent periods of deindustrialization in the course of the development of the world economy.

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The article calls for a more flexible understanding of "deindustrialization" that views the term less as an "era" and more as an inherent characteristic of capitalism and argues that the recent literature on deindustrialization holds important lessons for historians examining the period before 1970.
One looks forward to the next volume that could provide the same depth of analysis of the fifty years from the 1930s to the period of massive deindustrialization that characterized the 1980s.
That was the latest blow in a deindustrialization of Youngstown that has been going on for 40 years now, bringing with it a sharp population decline, abandoned housing and a rise in rates of addiction, suicide and domestic violence.
He said deindustrialization in Pakistan was a grave conspiracy against people that sadly become successful.
The present government's economic policies, he said, were based on controlling imports, increasing exports, stopping deindustrialization, revival of industry and encouraging expatriates to send remittances through legal channels to double them from the present$20 billion to $40 billion per year.
Among his topics are dual development, segmented labor markets, and urban regimes; satellite governance, public finance, and networks of power; racial and gender segmentation in tourism and services; and deindustrialization versus joined-up workplace and community struggle.
The scholarly focus on declining industrial employment has shifted from the "body count" of lost jobs and resistance to closures toward a focus on "the cultural meaning of deindustrialization." (6) This article looks "beyond the ruins" of industry, instead considering the long-term consequences of changes in employment practices.
Reaching beyond the black/white binary, the author shows how whiteness works in respect to Asian Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans, also the author delineates the weaknesses embedded in civil rights laws, the racial dimensions of economic restructuring and deindustrialization, and the effects of environmental racism, job discrimination and school segregation; and analyzes the centrality of whiteness to U.S.
In the past couple of years, analyses of deindustrialization (such as the work of the Economic Innovation Group) have focused on the devastation wrought by factory closures in disproportionately white small cities and towns across the once-industrial Midwest.
At the same time, the USA and most Western European countries experienced severe deindustrialization. Only a few countries, for instance Germany, did not develop accordingly.
For economic historians, the most important aspect of Goldthorpe's story lies in his querying of the standard notion of colonial deindustrialization. Malaysia was not a classical colonial economy at independence, structured to supply the West with raw materials.
The new possibility of combining high tech with low wages propelled the rapid industrialization of a handful of developing nations, the simultaneous deindustrialization of developed nations, and a commodity supercycle that is only now petering out.