deindustrialization

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deindustrialization

the process in which a previously industrialized or industrializing economy, or society, or region, reverts partly or wholly to a preindustrialized form. This process may occur as the outcome of international economic competition (see DEPENDENCY THEORY, also IMPERIALISM).

To some degree, the process may also occur within developed societies (e.g. the recent regional decline of manufacturing industries such as textiles or shipbuilding in parts of Western Europe). Nor is it simply a recent phenomenon. Rather, it can be seen as a ‘normal’ aspect of the workings of capitalism on an international stage at all phases of its development. According to WALLERSTEIN (1974), societies as different as Poland and India are examples of economies which underwent periods of deindustrialization in the course of the development of the world economy.

Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
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Consider this: if factory jobs were really shrinking because imports were deindustrializing America, then manufacturing output as a share of overall U.S.
See Staughton Lynd, The Fight Against Shutdowns: Youngstown's Steel Mill Closings (San Pedro, 1982); Stephen High, "Deindustrializing Youngstown: Memories of Resistance and Loss in the Decades following 'Black Monday,'" History Workshop Journal 54 (2002): 100-21; John Russo and Sherry Lee Linkon, "Collateral Damage: Deindustrialization and the Uses of Youngstown" in Cowie and Heathcott, Beyond the Ruins, 201-18.
We would like to conclude with a broader question: how can community members in deindustrializing and post-industrial regions draw upon residual structures of feeling to inform an emergent culture that challenges the destitution wrought by dominant neoliberal hegemony ?
In scratching the supposedly rusting surface of Ontario's economy, it is not so obvious that the province is deindustrializing, or that its auto sector needs to be put out of its misery.
[the] trade deficit is deindustrializing the United States...".
Normalizations taking into account differences in the size of territory and climate reduce this gross disparity, but the net difference remains large, particularly considering that the United States has been deindustrializing, whereas energy-intensive manufacturing remains much stronger in Germany and Japan.
While these facts explain the tenor of the 2008 presidential campaign throughout the deindustrializing Midwest, they do not prove that outsourcing and trade are to blame for our manufacturing woes.
Once growth became both the means and end of our deindustrializing economy, and as the quantification of the net effect on growth of various human actions became the closest approximation of passion an economist's heart can muster, it was only a matter of time before profligacy became civic virtue.
In deindustrializing economies, the reduction in blue-collar power has in part been manifested by the declining influence of trade unionism (see Freeman 1993).
River City School District is one the largest districts in a deindustrializing state.
Missing from this analysis, however, are the personalized landscapes that also contribute to the understanding of industrial heritage in deindustrializing cities and small towns.
Perot accused NAFTA of "deindustrializing our country," and Rep.