Delirium

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delirium

a state of excitement and mental confusion, often accompanied by hallucinations, caused by high fever, poisoning, brain injury, etc.

Delirium

 

the totality of ideas and concepts not corresponding to reality, distorting reality, and not lending themselves to correction. Delirium completely takes possession of the consciousness and is characterized by the destruction of logical thinking. It is a symptom of many mental illnesses (for example, schizophrenia and alcoholism).

There are two varieties of delirium. In so-called primary delirium, rational, logical cognition is affected; distorted judgment is consistently reinforced by a series of subjective proofs having their own system. This type of delirium is persistent and has a tendency to be progressive. “Emotional” delirium is characterized by images, primarily day-dreams and fantasies; ideas are fragmentary and inconsistent; and rational and emotional cognition are disturbed. Delirium can be eliminated when the underlying illness is cured.


Delirium

 

clouding of consciousness that generally occurs at the height of an infectious disease and is accompanied by a flood of vivid visual hallucinations, raving, and motor excitation. Delirium provoked by alcohol is called delirium tremens.

delirium

[di′lir·ē·əm]
(medicine)
Severely disordered mental state associated with fever, intoxication, head trauma, and other encephalopathies.

Delirium

An embedding coordinate language for parallel programming, implemented on Sequent Symmetry, Cray, BBN Butterfly.

["Parallel Programming with Coordination Structures", S. Lucco et al, 18th POPL, pp.197-208 (1991)].
References in periodicals archive ?
Bantas experience with delirium is more common and has longer-lasting effects than was once believed.
Part of an interdisciplinary group leading UCSF efforts to better prevent and manage delirium in the ICU, Schell-Chaple who is also associate faculty at UCSF School of Nursing, says, It used to be that we associated delirium only with the hyperactive form, but one important finding of the studies is that hypoactive delirium where patients are inattentive or unresponsive is more common and underdiagnosed.
A number of studies have looked to account for nocturnal delirium in various ways including in terms of disturbance in circadian rhythm and/or changes in sleep cycles.
elderly subjects suffering from nocturnal delirium in a darkened room and found that without repeated visualization they would not be able to preserve the orientation of objects (i.e.
Many Factors at Play Delirium is a state of mental confusion that is thought to occur due to multiple, interrelated factors, some of which are pre-existing and some that are connected to hospitalization.
In a recent study (Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, May 17) of 320 people (median age 61), admitted to the Intensive Care Unit, nearly 30 percent of the participants experienced delirium at least once.
Delirium is a multi-factorial neuropsychiatric syndrome that has a significant impact on patient care by increasing economic costs, hospital length of stay, morbidity, and mortality (Rivosecchi, Smithburger, Svec, Campbell, & Kane-Gill, 2015).
Literature Summary * Literature suggests a decrease in delirium occurs when multicomponent interventions are used despite the patient population (Abraha et al., 2015; Martinez, Tobar, & Hill, 2015; Moyce, Rodseth, & Biccard, 2014).
What is delirium? Delirium is defined as a temporary state of confusion which could be constant or fluctuating.
What conditions increase the risk of developing delirium? The conditions that may increase the risks of delirium include: old age, problems with hearing and seeing, mood problems, multiple long term and acute illnesses, dehydration, chest or bladder infections, stroke, imbalance of salts in the blood, physical and mental disabilities, kidney failure, Parkinson's disease, dementia and the use of sedatives and painkillers.
In leading an improvement in the care of patients suffering from delirium the GNPCs investigated local prevalence data using an audit study by Speed et al (2007) for comparative values in the Australian health system.
This audit showed an actual recognition level of delirium at 2.9%.