delusion

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Related to delusive: delusory, incrustation

delusion,

false belief based upon a misinterpretation of reality. It is not, like a hallucination, a false sensory perception, or like an illusion, a distorted perception. Delusions vary in intensity, and are not uncommon among substance abusers, particularly those who use amphetamines, cocaine, and hallucinogens. They also occur frequently among individuals who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's diseaseAlzheimer's disease
, degenerative disease of nerve cells in the cerebral cortex that leads to atrophy of the brain and senile dementia and, ultimately, death. The disease is characterized by abnormal accumulation of plaques and by neurofibrillary tangles (malformed nerve
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, Huntington's diseaseHuntington's disease,
hereditary, acute disturbance of the central nervous system usually beginning in middle age and characterized by involuntary muscular movements and progressive intellectual deterioration; formerly called Huntington's chorea.
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, or schizophreniaschizophrenia
, group of severe mental disorders characterized by reality distortions resulting in unusual thought patterns and behaviors. Because there is often little or no logical relationship between the thoughts and feelings of a person with schizophrenia, the disorder has
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, and during the manic stage of bipolar disorder (see depressiondepression,
in psychiatry, a symptom of mood disorder characterized by intense feelings of loss, sadness, hopelessness, failure, and rejection. The two major types of mood disorder are unipolar disorder, also called major depression, and bipolar disorder, whose sufferers are
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). Some common delusions include persecutory delusions, in which the individual falsely believes that others are plotting against him; delusions of thought broadcasting, where the individual believes his thoughts can be transmitted to others; delusions of thought insertion, in which the individual believes that thoughts are being implanted in his mind; and delusions of grandeur, in which the individual imagines himself an unappreciated person of great importance.

delusion

[di′lüzh·ən]
(psychology)
A conviction based on faulty perceptions, feelings, and thinking.

Delusion

Borkman, John Gabriel
suffers from delusions of power. [Nor. Lit.: John Gabriel Borkman]
Bowles, Sally
night-club entertainer thinks she has the makings of a great film actress. [Br. Lit.: Isherwood Berlin Stories in Drabble, 498]
Clamence, Jean-Baptiste
living with his own good and evil. [Fr. Lit.: The Fall]
Dubois, Blanche
felt she and Mitch were above others. [Am. Lit.: A Streetcar Named Desire]
Jones, Brutus
self-styled island emperor experiences traumatic visions. [Am. Lit.: Emperor Jones]
Lockit, Lucy
steals jailer-father’s keys to free phony husband. [Br. Lit.: The Beggar’s Opera]
Pan, Peter
little boy, refuses to grow up; resides in Never Never Land. [Children’s Lit.: Peter Pan]
opium of the people
Marx’s classic metaphor for religion. [Ger. Hist.: Critique of Hegel’s “Philosophy of Right”]
ostrich
hides head, thinking itself concealed. [Animal Symbolism: Brewer Dictionary, 788]

delusion

Psychiatry a belief held in the face of evidence to the contrary, that is resistant to all reason
References in periodicals archive ?
In both cases horse dreaming and its loss articulates a deeper meditation on the creative force of imagination and its equally delusive potential.
The masculine ego of both Amin and Santiago--even if they have different ages--interacts with the delusive water, whose femininity increases in direct relation with their virility.
This strategy is not only desperate; it is also delusive, for it seems obvious that, if the planet is to remain habitable, competition in economic growth must give way to competition in quality of life.
Vondel shows that the old woman is so overwhelmed by emotions that she can create only delusive mental images.
The earth which the hero treads becomes a fruitful, though unfortunately delusive, oasis.
This 15-minute short, directed by Jan Riesenbeck, involved a cast of more than 200 extras in its depiction of delusive worlds and life as a puzzle: "sometimes, all the pieces fit together, but the picture makes no sense at all", is the intriguing concept behind the storyline.
Hilla / NINA / Member of the provincial council of Babylon Hassan al-Janabi warned of the existence of delusive civil society organizations with fake certificates that could be exploited by terrorist sides and some countries in espionage operations and the transfer of information to parties hostile to the security and stability of Iraq in general and Babylon in particular.
Frances Wyers depicts this opposition between history and intrahistory noting that "the former is the record of people who act and 'make noise' and whose works constitute a 'false and delusive tradition', while the latter ...
Smith sees Beatrice, the prophetess of Ferrera, and Euthanasia, the queen of Valperga castle, as the two extremes of female prophecy: Beatrice represents wild, delusive enthusiasm whereas Euthanasia stands for a more progressive prophecy "tempered by an expansive philosophical outlook that enables her to change and grow" (207).
So we donaACAOt want delusive promises and populist speeches.
(4.) "Disappointment" appears frequently in the work of Samuel Johnson's and other writers but never accompanied by "cheat." In his Life of John Wesley Childs (1852) John Ellis Edwards (1852) cites a letter to Childs' sister dated May 3, 1837: "The World is all a delusive dream--nay, a cheat; let us then put it down...." (170).
Every now and then the world is visited by one of these delusive seasons, when the "credit system" ...