demarcation

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demarcation

, demarkation
separation or distinction (often in the phrase line of demarcation)
References in periodicals archive ?
Maaz Ahmed Tango told SUNA that the two sides have agreed to sponsor the report of the Technical Committee on demarcation of the joint borders on the areas agreed upon, adding that the commission has directed the the joint committee to complete the arrangements to prepare a comprehensive report on planning for demarkation of the joint borders.
This "scheme of national demarkation [sic] between Jew and gentile" (33), threatens to make visible the very same demarcation, the invisibility of which is key to the second basic assumption of Veblen's program, the assumption that full immersion of Jews in Europe is impossible.
Nay, farther; a legislature, instituted even by a written constitution, but without a special demarkation of powers, may, perhaps, be presumed to be left at large, as to all authority which is communicable by the people ...
As one court observed, "the line of demarkation [sic] is not a line at all but a murky 'twilight zone.'"
when millions shall be crowded into our manufactories and commercial cities--then will come the great and fearful pressure upon the engine--then will the line of demarkation [sic] stand most palpably drawn, between the rich and the poor, the capitalist and the laborer-- then will thousands, yea millions arise, whose hard lot it may be to labor from morn till eve through a long life, without the cheering hope of passing from that toilsome condition in which the first years of their manhood found them, or even of accumulating in advance that small fund which may release the old and infirm from labor and toil, and mitigate the sorrow of declining years.
On August 19, 1825, a treaty was negotiated at Prairie du Chien, Michigan Territory, in which the Chippewa and the Sioux agreed on a line of demarkation [sic] between their territories....
However, Coun Mullaney admitted that getting rid of all demarkation between road and pavement, as has happened in parts of Europe, might not be suitable for Birmingham.