demesne

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demesne

(dĭmān`), land under feudalismfeudalism
, form of political and social organization typical of Western Europe from the dissolution of Charlemagne's empire to the rise of the absolute monarchies. The term feudalism is derived from the Latin feodum,
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 kept by the lord for his own use and occupation as distinguished from that granted to tenants. Initially the demesne lands were worked by the serfs in payment of the feudal debt. As the serfs' labor service came to be commuted to money payments, the demesne lands were often cultivated by paid laborers. Eventually many of the demesne lands were leased out either on a perpetual, and therefore hereditary, or a temporary, and therefore renewable, basis so that many peasants functioned virtually as free proprietors after having paid their fixed rents. In England the term ancient demesne, sometimes shortened to demesne, referred to those lands that were held by the crown at the time (1066) of William the Conqueror and were recorded in the Domesday Book. The term demesne also referred to the demesne of the crown, or royal demesne, which consisted of those lands reserved for the crown at the time of the original distribution of landed property. The royal demesne could be increased, for example, as a result of forfeiture. The lands were managed by stewards of the crown and were not given out in fief.

demesne

All lands belonging to the lord of a manor.

demesne

1. land, esp surrounding a house or manor, retained by the owner for his own use
2. Property law the possession and use of one's own property or land
3. the territory ruled by a state or a sovereign; realm; domain
4. a region or district; domain
References in periodicals archive ?
The geld was not increased to full capacity, but barons agreed to pay the tax due on their demesnes.
A survey of the king's own demesne estates and dues is most apparent.
Although this subject was surveyed magisterially as long ago as 1976 in Edward Malins and the Knight of Glin's Lost Demesnes, Irish Landscape Gardening, 1660-1845, the present study's close reading of a variety of sources, documentary and physical, offers a wholly new perspective.
The famous demesnes of Castletown and Carton are explored in similar detail.
Continuing ahead into Thorngate, within yards, we turn right into Thorngate Place and at the end of the housing turn left to walk up the western edge of the open ground that forms the Demesnes.
Cast ewes: Texel-94 Craster 88 Annstead 88, 84 Edlingham Demesnes, West Edington, Wingates Moor, Suffolk-96 Blagdon Burn 92, 87 Widdrington 90, 89 Thrunton Red House 88 Stonecroft, Crookdene.
The Demesnes, controlled by Teesdale District Council, was bought from Raby Estates in the late 1940s for "the enjoyment of the people of Teesdale".