demi-bastion

demi-bastion

In military architecture, a bastion constructed of one face, 1 and one flank. Also called a half-bastion.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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He was one morning lying upon his back in his bed, the anguish and nature of the wound upon his groin suffering him to lie in no other position, when a thought came into his head, that if he could purchase such a thing, and have it pasted down upon a board, as a large map of the fortification of the town and citadel of Namur, with its environs, it might be a means of giving him ease.--I take notice of his desire to have the environs along with the town and citadel, for this reason,--because my uncle Toby's wound was got in one of the traverses, about thirty toises from the returning angle of the trench, opposite to the salient angle of the demi-bastion of St.
In collapsing two versions of reality, tactical and personal, groin and demi-bastion, Toby is also collapsing facticity into the broad but user-friendly laws of probability.
While sympathetic to both Toby's predicament and his indulgence in specialized knowledge, this passage distances Toby's idiom from the familiar language of Tristram and the reader in its references to returning angles, salient angles, and demi-bastions. These terms appear as bewildering to the reader, because they were bewildering to Sterne, who, in Tristram's voice, conveys the experience of learning military science from Ephraim Chambers' Cyclopaedeia (1728) as a set of endless cross-references.
Places fortified, after the modern way, consist chiefly of Bastions, and Curtains, and Sometimes of Demi-bastions according to the Situation of the Ground, of Cavaliers, Ramparts, Fausse-brayes, Ditches, Counterscarps, Cover'd Ways, Half Moons, Ravelins, Hornworks, Crownworks, Outworks, Esplanades, Redents, and Tenailles.
The plain length of curtain wall running due south toward today's Bab Haha would necessarily have been partly buried (FILL) and partly razed (DEM) in 1564-6, for it intersected the new north-east demi-bastion, the retired flank behind the latter's orillon, and the flanker artillery emplacement and casemate.
Tower VII S, located in the retired flank/flanker casemate area of the south-west demi-bastion, must have been partly razed (DEM).
With the addition of the northeast demi-bastion in the 1560s and of the Baluarte do Caranguejo in the 1620s-40s, no one saw any need to waste resources in refortifying curtain wall defences conveniently located above the naturally rugged north falaise.
To complicate the issues, the former north-wall towers between the Porta da traicao and the angle of the 1564-6 north-east demi-bastion (thus c.
As they do not belong to the original perimeter, the two towers further east along the north face of the new demi-bastion are not discussed here (see Elbl, Portuguese Tangier).