dendrochronology

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Related to dendrochronologists: annual ring, dendrochronological, Growth rings

dendrochronology:

see datingdating,
the determination of the age of an object, of a natural phenomenon, or of a series of events. There are two basic types of dating methods, relative and absolute.
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dendrochronology

[¦den·drō·krə′näl·ə·jē]
(geology)
The science of measuring time intervals and dating events and environmental changes by reading and dating growth layers of trees as demarcated by the annual rings.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dendrochronology

The dating of old timbers by the study of their annual ring patterns of growth.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
But dendrochronologists have deciphered a far more complex language that conveys stories, not just dales, otherwise hidden by the ravages of time.
Still, dendrochronologists have found use for nearly 700 different species of trees and shrubs.
With crossdating, dendrochronologists can extend the timelines for different trees or locations far beyond the oldest living trees.
The earliest images of Pacific Northwest forests are provided by dendrochronologists, fire ecologists and archaeologists who search the remains of ancient timber stands for evidence of what was in forests long since gone.
Dendrochronologists construct tree ring histories by using many trees whose lifespans overlap.
Because trees put on different kinds of wood in early summer and in late summer, dendrochronologists can count annual rings to figure out how old a tree is.
I also wanted to tell him a dendrochronologist (a scientist who accurately dates trees using tree rings) was going to examine the tree.
The report caught the eyes of David Stahle and Malcolm Cleaveland, dendrochronologists at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville.
The widths of trees' annual growth rings reveal what the climate was like in the years they formed, said Anchukaitis, who joined WHOI in September as its first dendrochronologist, or tree-ring specialist.
True, he refers to himself as a dendrochronologist or a paleoclimatologist, depending on his mood when you ask him.
Stahle has teamed with fellow UA dendrochronologist Malcolm Cleaveland.