dendroecology

dendroecology

[‚den·drō·ē′käl·ə·jē]
(archeology)
The science of analyzing changes in ecological processes over time using tree-ring information.
(ecology)
The use of tree rings to study changes in ecological processes over time such as defoliation by insect outbreaks; the effects of air, water, and soil pollution on tree growth and forest health; the age, maturity, and successional status of forest stands; and the effects of human disturbances and management on forest vitality.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Temporal variation in species recruitment and dendroecology of an old-growth white oak forest in the Virginia Piedmont, USA.
Diploma in forest sciences at ETH Zurich, PhD in dendroecology at the University of Basel, Switzerland.
Allometric relationships and dendroecology of the dwarf shrub Dryas integrifolia near Churchill, subarctic Manitoba.
Dendroecology is the study of the ecological and environmental changes depicted in the annual rings of trees.
"What we have learned through the current epidemic is that there is a need for better planning and innovative approaches to salvage harvesting in the MPB-killed forests, not clear cutting everything," said Kate Hrinkevich, a doctoral student in dendroecology (the study of ecology through the examination of tree rings) at UNBC.
Key words: Argentina; Austrocedrus chilensis; climatic variability; dendroecology; ecotones; experimental microsites; facilitation; nurse shrubs; Patagonia; recruitment; seedling survivorship.
Key words: age distributions; canopy disturbance; dendroecology; disturbance frequency and periodicity; forest disturbance; oak forest; radial-growth analysis; tree recruitment data; tree-ring chronologies.