dengue fever

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dengue fever

(dĕng`gē, –gā), acute infectious disease caused by four closely related viruses and transmitted by the bite of the female Aedes mosquito; it is also known as breakbone fever and bone-crusher disease. The disease occurs in both epidemic and sporadic form in warm climates (S United States, South America, the E Mediterranean countries, India, and especially SE Asia and the W Pacific). The classic symptoms, following an incubation period of five to eight days, are high fever, chills, severe headache, pain in the joints, pain behind the eyes, rash, sweating, and prostration, but infected persons may experience milder symptoms. Symptoms subside in two to four days, but after a remission lasting from a few hours to two days there is another rise in temperature, and a generalized rash appears. Convalescence is sometimes prolonged, with weakness and low blood pressure.

Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a severe form of the disease, can cause hemorrhage, shock, and encephalitis. It can occur when a person who has acquired immunity to one of the viruses that cause dengue fever is infected by a different dengue virus; antibodies to the first dengue infection apparently work to aid the second virus. It is a leading cause of death among children in Southeast Asia and in recent years has become increasingly prevalent in tropical America. There is no specific treatment for dengue fever except good nursing care. Both diseases can be controlled by eradicating the mosquitoes and destroying their breeding places; the mosquito population also has been controlled through the release of sterile male mosquitoes.

Dengue fever

[′deŋ·gē ‚fēv·ər]
(medicine)
An infection borne by the Aedes female mosquito, and caused by one of four closely related but antigenically distinct Dengue virus serotypes (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, and DEN-4). It starts abruptly after an incubation period of 2-7 days with high fever, severe headache, myalgia, and rash. It is found throughout the tropical and subtropical zones. Also known as break-bone fever.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said those reported with dengue virus should take more water, juices, milk, fruits and soup while use of apple juice and lemon juices would up boost the resistance power of the dengue affected patients.
The Chairman has asked for an aggressive awareness campaign and maximum preventive measures would be introduced among the masses to ensure complete control over the dengue virus.
Transovarial transmission of dengue viruses ensures presence of viral pathogen in mosquitoes independent of their feeding upon an infective human blood carrying dengue virus (3,4).
Strains and concentration of DEN viruses for artificial inoculation of Aedes aegypti Serotype of Strains Viral titer Volume dengue virus concentration (PFU/ml) ([micro]l) DEN-1 Hawaiian 1.
Angel & Joshi (9) have detected dengue virus in individual mosquito head squashes and the remnants of positive mosquitoes have been used in cell culture and mice inoculation followed by IFA.
Dengue virus infection among children with undifferentiated fever in Karachi.
In addition, we believe that the dengue virus infection was very well controlled in these treated animals.
In India, the reports of natural vertical transmission of dengue viruses are scarce, although the field evidence supporting vertical transmission as a means of persistence has been obtained for dengue virus (5-6).
Because dengue virus does not require a nonhuman vertebrate reservoir, it was able to disseminate in regions where competent vectors were present.
Several of the anti-Dengue nanoviricides[R] demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibition of Dengue virus infectivity in two distinctly different cell culture models of dengue virus infection.
RAWALPINDI -- Rawalpindi Cantonment Board staff launched fumigation in various areas to avert spread of dengue virus.
RAWALPINDI -- In order to avert attack of dengue virus, all possible preventive measures must be adopted as prevention is better than cure said Deputy Medical Superintendent (DMS) Holy Family Hospital (HFH) Dr.