denial


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Related to denial: Defense mechanisms

denial,

in psychology, an ego defense mechanism that operates unconsciously to resolve emotional conflict, and to allay anxiety by refusing to perceive the more unpleasant aspects of external reality. In the psychoanalytic theory of Sigmund FreudFreud, Sigmund
, 1856–1939, Austrian psychiatrist, founder of psychoanalysis. Born in Moravia, he lived most of his life in Vienna, receiving his medical degree from the Univ. of Vienna in 1881.

His medical career began with an apprenticeship (1885–86) under J.
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, denial is described as a primitive defense mechanismdefense mechanism,
in psychoanalysis, any of a variety of unconscious personality reactions which the ego uses to protect the conscious mind from threatening feelings and perceptions.
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. Anna FreudFreud, Anna
, 1895–1982, British psychoanalyst, b. Vienna, Austria. Continuing the work of her father, Sigmund Freud, she was a pioneer in the psychoanalysis of children.
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 studied the widespread occurrence of denial among small children and explained that the mature ego does not continue to make extensive use of denial, because it conflicts with the capacity to recognize and critically test reality. Most people employ denial at some time in their lives when coping with stressful situations, such as the death of a loved one. Elisabeth Kübler-RossKübler-Ross, Elisabeth
, 1926–2004, American psychiatrist, b. Switzerland. After studying medicine at the Univ. of Zürich (M.D. 1957), Kübler-Ross became a pioneer in the field of thanatology, the study of death and dying.
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's influential theory describes denial as the first stage of a dying person's progress in coming to terms with terminal illness. In such instances, denial may be considered adaptive. It is considered maladaptive, however, when it becomes delusional. In recent years, the term is used more generally, to describe the suppression of reality rather than a particular defense mechanism in the Freudian sense.

denial

[di′nī·əl]
(mathematics)
(psychology)
An unconscious defense mechanism in which an individual denies herself or himself recognition of an observation in order to avoid pain or anxiety.

denial

1. the rejection of the truth of a proposition, doctrine, etc.
2. a psychological process by which painful truths are not admitted into an individual's consciousness
References in periodicals archive ?
He was a founding father of the heartbeat of denial that lives through both Trump's denials and the assertion that his racial views are abnormal for America and its presidents.
Republican lawmakers also ignored the president's denial and continued to criticise him even after he released the tweet that is being interpreted as a vague denial.
Robert Jay Lifton, whose new book "The Climate Swerve" says that, despite denial by many corporations and governments, there are signs that humanity is nearing a major change - a profound cultural swerve - in thinking and action on climate change.
Considering the spectrum of denial reasons, it's apparent that this is an organization-wide problem that must be managed by multiple disciplines.
Prevention Approaches For Denial Of Sleep Attack: Absorbing Markov Chain (AMC) model:
House Speaker Yiannakis Omirou was keen to add a clause to the legislation, making genocide denial a criminal offence whether it has been recognised by an international court or by a resolution of the Cyprus parliament.
Denial is a defense mechanism that people use to overcome unpleasant feelings of guilt about a wrong-doing.
The phenomenon of non-psychotic denial of pregnancy is not restricted to primiparous women, since it can occur in the second or third pregnancy.
Francois Hollande to keep his promises and come forward with a new bill on criminalizing of the Armenian genocide denial NOW!", -
If the treating physician agrees that discharge can occur, UR should work with the treating physician and discharge planners to obtain a discharge even before a denial is issued.
Critique: While especially and unreservedly recommended for community library Contemporary General Fiction collections, it should be noted for personal reading lists that "A Hairpiece Named Denial" is also available in a digital book format (Kindle, $6.95).
However, depending on the reasons for a denial, it could still be possible to salvage the case and get it approved.