denier


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denier

1. a unit of weight used to measure the fineness of silk and man-made fibres, esp when woven into women's tights, etc. It is equal to 1 gram per 9000 metres
2. any of several former European coins of various denominations

denier

[′den·yər]
(textiles)
A unit expressing the mass of a fiber divided by its length, equal to 1 gram for 9000 meters of fiber.
References in periodicals archive ?
Denier is a clinical cardiologist at South Nassau Communities Hospital's Center for Cardiovascular Health.
Nylon filament yarn linear density (denier) was checked through skein method by [7] on digital Uster Autosorter III that give direct reading.
Kate Middleton has certainly made them cool and low denier sheer tights mimic the colour of your skin and are ideal for evenings out or warm weather conditions.
Almost all the climate change deniers, even President George W Bush, now allow the forbidden phrase to pass their lips, but that doesn't mean they have really accepted the need to do something about it.
Solomon says he deliberately chose the provocative term "deniers" to label the people he profiled, because he felt it was a tongue-in-cheek way to suggest that those who question the line on climate change are shunned from society, as are those who deny the Holocaust.
"I have found myself increasingly chastised by climate change campaigners when my public statements and lectures on climate change have not satisfied their thirst for environmental drama and exaggerated rhetoric." Is the preceding quote from a climate change "denier?" No, it's from Mike Hulme, director of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research and one of Britain's leading climate scientists.
Do the arguments of the Holocaust deniers have any credibility?
In order to be called a "microfiber," the fiber must be less than one denier. Fine silk, for example, is approximately 1.25 denier.
Some designers are talking about going even lower than 3 denier. Pure nonwoven designs have gone from 2% to 15% use in Europe.
Evans reminds us that David Irving initiated the suit against Penguin Books and Deborah Lipstadt, a historian who teaches at Emory University, who in her book, Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory, had denounced Irving as a dangerous Holocaust denier. In English law, defamation cases are settled generally in favor of the plaintiff, inasmuch as the accuser simply has to demonstrate that the defendant had published statements that on the face of it were damaging to the plaintiff's reputation or honor--unlike American law, where the First Amendment guarantees freedom of speech, and a plaintiff who is a public figure must show both falsity and malice on the part of the author of the objectionable statements.
A Neo-Nazi and White Supremacist, Furrow had been indoctrinated as a denier of the Holocaust and practitioner of "leaderless resistance" to ZOG (the Zionist Organized Government) at the Hayden Lake, Idaho, compound of Christian Identity preacher Richard Butler.(12)