dense core

dense core

A small centrally condensed molecular cloud, typically of less than 500 solar masses. The central density is high enough to excite lines of ammonia and carbon monosulphide (CS), the latter observed with millimeter-wave telescopes. Many of these cores contain IRAS point sources that appear to be YSOs with luminosities indicating low-mass stars.
References in periodicals archive ?
The second event was a merger of two neutron stars, the incredibly dense core of a collapsed giant star.
After the star goes nova, it leaves behind a dense core, known as a neutron star.
"Thus far, the majority of the micros in the Twin Cities have been developed in the dense core areas of the cities," he said.
A neutron star, the ultra dense core of a massive star that collapses and undergoes a supernova explosion, is found at its center.
Does it have a solid surface, or does it resemble Neptune, with a dense core surrounded by swirling clouds of gas?
Levenson, "Regulation of dense core vesicle release from PC12 cells by interaction between the D2 dopamine receptor and calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS)," Biochemical Pharmacology, vol.
Our star, the Sun, shares the Milky Way with about 500billion other stars, many of which are concentrated in the dense core of the galaxy.
Astronomers suspect that such explosions, called type la supernovas, are the detonation of a white dwarf, the dense core left behind after some stars die.
After first expanding into a red giant and engulfing the inner planets (which in the Solar System will include Earth), the star sheds its outer layers to leave a small and very dense core. (Cihan/Sputnik) Cihan CyHAN
Computed tomography (CT) scan at initial presentation showed a single stone with a dense core (995 Hounsfield unit [HU]) surrounded by a softer shell (480 HU).
The result is characteristic power and intensity, founded on a dense core of fruit.