dental arch


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dental arch

[¦dent·əl ′ärch]
(anatomy)
The parabolic curve formed by the cutting edges and masticating surfaces of the teeth.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the original one, it is possible to delimit clearly the dental roots of some teeth, mainly of the premolars, whereas in the biomodels the region of dental arch is not so well identifiable.
Retentive Maxillary canines are the longest teeth in the human dental arch, and have variation in working lengths.13 Hence maxillary canines were studied in the present research.
Ten measurements concerning dental arch development were performed as follows.
As stated previously, maintaining shortened dental arch can provide secure mastication and nutrition, if there are enough occluding pairs of teeth (more than 8 in total).
Longitudinal study of dental arch relationships in Australian Aboriginals with reference to alternate intercuspation.
The shape of the dental arch which is obtained by configuration of the supporting bone after the eruption of the teeth, the circum-oral musculature and intra-oral forces are of esthetic and functional importance.
After leveling the dental arches, extraction spaces were closed by sliding mechanics to gain an ideal incisor inclination according to our cephalometric surgical prediction tracing (Figure 3-5).
The analysis of the distribution of DE-affected teeth to different dental arches revealed that the left-to-right ratio was 1:1 and that the occurrence of DE was significantly (p<0.05) higher in the mandible (78.8%) compared to the maxilla (21.2%).
Effect of the lower third molars on the lower dental arch crowding.
Melani, "Intercanine distance in the analysis of bite marks: a comparison of human and domestic dog dental arches," Journal of Forensic Odonto-Stomatology, vol.
It was not possible to maintain the most posterior implant of the left side in the planning of the new crowns since it was very vestibularized and outside the patient's dental arch, jeopardizing the hygiene of the new crowns so it was decided to bury it (Figure 6).
With this loss of space in the dental arch can subsequently cause over-crowding of teeth, disrupting the harmony between the molars and the canines and forcing the need of correcting this with braces.