dental

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dental

[′dent·əl]
(anatomy)
Pertaining to the teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The orthokeratinized variant of the odontogenic keratocyst also called orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) arises from the rests of the dental lamina.
The resemblance between dental lamina rests and the glycogen rich epithelial islands of the lateral periodontal cyst raises the possibility of a dental lamina source.
As the most common epithelial odontogenic neoplasm, (1,2) ameloblastoma may arise from dental lamina, developing enamel organ, epithelial lining of an odontogenic cyst or basal cells of oral mucosa.
Expression and function of NOTCH path-way component genes during tooth development Stages of tooth Patterns of expression of NOTCH pathway development in mice components during odontogenesis Expression of Notch1, Notch2 and Notch3 in dental lamina (34) Dental lamina (E11) Jag2 in dental epithelium (14) Jag1 in dental epithelium (36) Delta1 in dental lamina (35) Expression of Notch1, Notch2 and Notch3 in entire dental epithelium (34) Jag2 in internal and external dental epithelium (14) Bud (E12, E13-5,5) Jag1 in dental epithelium and mesenchyme, there is no expression in dental epithelium adjacent to mesenchyme.
Various explanations of origin have been proposed, including the basal cells of the oral epithelium, rests of the dental lamina, and the stratum intermedium, as well as reduced enamel epithelium.
Osr2 restricts Bmp4 expression to the tooth mesenchyme under the dental lamina, and in Osr2's absence, Bmp4 gene expression expands into the jaw mesenchyme outside of the tooth row.
These include anomalies of the dental lamina, proliferation disorders, abnormalities of morphology, developmental defects of the enamel and dentin, the effects of prematurity and low birth weight, eruption disorders, and loss of tooth structures.
Etiological factors for non-syndromic hypodontia are changes in the dental lamina formation, failure of tooth germ to develop at the optimal time, space limitations and genetic factors.
It is an aggressive benign tumor that may originate from enamel organ, remnants of dental lamina, epithelial lining of an odontogenic cyst or basal epithelial cells of the oral mucosa.
Their etiology is still unknown, (3,6,7) although numerous genetic theories have been suggested, such as: phylogenetic atavism or reversion, tooth bud dichotomy, dental lamina hyperactivity, autosomal dominant, (3-6) autosomal recessive, and chromosome X-linked heredities, and multifactorial (6) genetic patterns.
Ameloblastoma can originate in the dental lamina (or its derivatives, such as epithelial rests), in the epithelial lining of odontogenic cysts, in basal cells of the surface epithelium, and in epithelium of the enamel organ.