dental

(redirected from dental prosthesis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to dental prosthesis: dental prosthetics

dental

[′dent·əl]
(anatomy)
Pertaining to the teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
These data point again to the importance of interdisciplinary work, as well as of speech therapy evaluation integrated to the adaptation of the dental prosthesis.
In this study, young adults aged from 20 to 44 years showed reduced severity of evaluated clinical oral health conditions, such as caries experience, gingival pockets, use and need of dental prosthesis.
Conclusions: Improved sterile techniques in handling dental prosthesis can substantially reduce cross contamination that may occur from the pumice and rag wheel, thereby diminishing the patient's exposure to potentially pathogenic bacteria.
This study has aimed the three-dimensional analysis by the method of finite elements the level and distribution of stress equivalent of Von Mises induced in bone, the lower element of dental prosthesis, depending on the number of implants constituting the denture.
1%) patients and total inferior dental prosthesis in 5 (5%).
6) If a denture is found via rigid esophagoscopy to be deeply embedded in the wall of the esophagus, then esophagotomy is the best option for removing the dental prosthesis.
The present work has been supported from the CNCSIS PNII, ID 1878/2008-"Analytical evaluation of materials and dental prosthesis durability based on fracture toughness and cracks rate propagation".
For example, in the infiniDent process this improves the adhesion between the cobalt-chrome of the dental prosthesis framework and the subsequent layering with ceramic.
It pays up to pounds 1,000 per annum for routine dental treatment and consultations, dental prosthesis, orthodontic and periodontic.
Titanium is used along with alloys to produce the hull of space ships, the rotors of airplane turbines, missiles, computer pieces, electrical equipment and dental prosthesis.
It's known that Chiang did not wear his dental prosthesis while talking, as a "special honor" to his foreign guests [a story recounted in Gellhorn's Travels with Myself and Another].
If the natural dentition is lost, the person with a severe physical or mental impairment may not be able to manage a dental prosthesis to aid in eating, verbal communication, device-activated communication, and independent management of other tasks.