dentifrice

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dentifrice

any substance, esp paste or powder, for use in cleaning the teeth
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dentifrice

[′den·tə·fris]
(food engineering)
A paste, powder, or liquid preparation used to clean teeth.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of fluoride dentifrices on enamel lesion formation.
When promoted for dentistry in the U.S., advocates suggest activated charcoal can be used by brushing the contents of an over-the-counter capsule directly onto the teeth, purchasing a pre-mixed paste, or mixing activated charcoal with other ingredients to create your own "do it yourself paste that replaces your traditional dentifrice. Regarding pre-mixed paste, advertisers tend to use verbiage that appeals to patients seeking a holistic life style such as "ecofriendly," "pure," and "natural" and point to organic ingredients (11).
Paes Leme, The Importance of Fluoride Dentifrices to the Current Dental Caries Prevalence in Brazil, Brazilian Dental Journal, 15, 167 (2004).
Au dAaAaAeAa l'usine fabriquait du shampoing, mais aussi du dentifrice (Tonigencyl et Colgate) et du savon.
The effects of three silica dentifrices containing Triclosan on supragingival plaque and calculus formation and on gingivitis.
The short-term results of this study concluded that the silver ion-containing toothbrushes exhibited promising outcomes as an alternative to standard oral hygiene strategies applied with dentifrices in teenagers.
The rationale of this study is to evaluate the instant decrease in dentinal hypersensitivity by using dentifrice containing 8% Arginine-CaCO3 following scaling and root planning.
It is well documented that application of dentifrices containing stannous fluoride [15-17] and sodium fluoride [18-21] can promote the deposition of mineral precipitates within open dentinal tubules, thereby reducing fluid flow in dentine tubules following exposure to stimuli.
Fluoride-containing dentifrices have been in common usage since the 1960s when it was shown that dentifrices containing sodium fluoride (NaF), disodium monofluorophosphate (MFP), stannous fluoride (SnF2), acidulated phosphate fluoride, or amine fluoride reduced the caries rates in children [1].
Clinical and biological aspects of dentifrices. New York: Oxford University Press; 1992.