denumerable


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denumerable

Maths capable of being put into a one-to-one correspondence with the positive integers; countable
References in periodicals archive ?
Suppose we are given a combinatorial class C which consists of a denumerable collection of objects built of the labelled atoms T (see [3, Ch.
Since M is also an arbitrary total ordered subset of incomplete preference pseudo separable set (E, [less than or equal to]), there is denumerable set {[x.sub.n]} [subset] M such that if x [member of] M, x [not equal to] sup M, there is [mathematical expression not reproducible].
(1) For any [sigma] > 0, there exist the denumerable set of positive eigenvalues [[chi].sub.i]([sigma]), where i = 1, 2, ..., of a finite multiplicity with only cumulative point at infinity.
The models of the two they consider here have a continuous time variable, a denumerable state space, and Boral spaces for control sets.
Si'lnikov, "A case of the existence of a denumerable set of periodic motions," Soviet Mathematics, Doklady, vol.
where [DELTA]([OMEGA]) is the collection of all the denumerable subsets of [OMEGA];
Let H be the direct sum of a denumerable number of copies of two dimensional Hilbert space R x R.
(5) The types of reductions that he analyses--not only from the continuous to the discrete, but from the problematic to the axiomatic, the intensive to the extensive, the nonmetric to the metric, the nondenumerable to the denumerable, the rhizomatic to the arborescent, the smooth to the striated, and so on--while interrelated, are not identical, and each would have to be analyzed on its own account.
If [[??].sub.[alpha]] is denumerable or connected, then:
Though you will never finish matching the two infinities, as long as you can craft a way to achieve 1-1C that will hold for the first case, the nth case, and the nth + 1 case, you will have proved your set "denumerable." That means that it is the same size as the 1, 2, 3, etc.
That is [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] for any denumerable subset [K.sub.0] [subset] K.
109], that "Cantor's set theory is so copious as to admit absolutely non-denumerable sets while axiomatic set theory [in particular, ZFC] is so limited [Skolem's paradox] that every non-denumerable set becomes denumerable in a higher system or in an absolute sense".