denial

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denial,

in psychology, an ego defense mechanism that operates unconsciously to resolve emotional conflict, and to allay anxiety by refusing to perceive the more unpleasant aspects of external reality. In the psychoanalytic theory of Sigmund FreudFreud, Sigmund
, 1856–1939, Austrian psychiatrist, founder of psychoanalysis. Born in Moravia, he lived most of his life in Vienna, receiving his medical degree from the Univ. of Vienna in 1881.

His medical career began with an apprenticeship (1885–86) under J.
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, denial is described as a primitive defense mechanismdefense mechanism,
in psychoanalysis, any of a variety of unconscious personality reactions which the ego uses to protect the conscious mind from threatening feelings and perceptions.
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. Anna FreudFreud, Anna
, 1895–1982, British psychoanalyst, b. Vienna, Austria. Continuing the work of her father, Sigmund Freud, she was a pioneer in the psychoanalysis of children.
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 studied the widespread occurrence of denial among small children and explained that the mature ego does not continue to make extensive use of denial, because it conflicts with the capacity to recognize and critically test reality. Most people employ denial at some time in their lives when coping with stressful situations, such as the death of a loved one. Elisabeth Kübler-RossKübler-Ross, Elisabeth
, 1926–2004, American psychiatrist, b. Switzerland. After studying medicine at the Univ. of Zürich (M.D. 1957), Kübler-Ross became a pioneer in the field of thanatology, the study of death and dying.
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's influential theory describes denial as the first stage of a dying person's progress in coming to terms with terminal illness. In such instances, denial may be considered adaptive. It is considered maladaptive, however, when it becomes delusional. In recent years, the term is used more generally, to describe the suppression of reality rather than a particular defense mechanism in the Freudian sense.

denial

[di′nī·əl]
(mathematics)
(psychology)
An unconscious defense mechanism in which an individual denies herself or himself recognition of an observation in order to avoid pain or anxiety.

denial

1. the rejection of the truth of a proposition, doctrine, etc.
2. a psychological process by which painful truths are not admitted into an individual's consciousness
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Another similarity is that both systems are deterministic, i.e., they deny the human capacity to make free choices.
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In the same letter, TEI also urged that a proposal to modify the rules under section 162(f) denying deductions for fines and penalties as well as a proposal to deny deductions for punitive damage awards or settlements be rejected.
Pentagon officials deny that ethical rules were broken but would not allow New York Times reporters to interview current medical staff members at the prison.
He has indicated that he will deny conspiring to supply cocaine.
The Service has indicated its intent to deny exclusions for gifts to holders of Crummey withdrawal powers when (1) the powerholders have no beneficial interest in the trust other than their withdrawal powers; (2) the powerholders hold only contingent remainder interests or discretionary income interests; or (3) the facts and circumstances indicate a prearranged understanding that the powerholder will not exercise his or her withdrawal power.
By denying there is a divine Being, men and women also deny His part in their existence; they deny any involvement from Him in the way they live their lives; they deny that He gives any hope of life after death; and they deny that He is involved in the world events that shape their lives.