Deontology

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Related to deontologists: consequentialists

Deontology

 

a branch of ethics that deals with the problem of duty. The term was introduced by the English utilitarian philosopher J. Bentham, who used the term to denote a theory of morality in general (Deontology, or the Science of Morals, vols. 1–2, 1834).

References in periodicals archive ?
Consequentialism can also resolve intramural libertarian policy debates that stump deontologists. For instance, deontological libertarians have burned thousands of calories arguing about intellectual property.
However, a deontologist may also strongly consider natural consequences of actions.
By contrast, deontologists ignore results, focusing instead on the act itself.
A deontologist would base her decision on a moral rule like "Do unto others as you would be done by", or the principle of autonomy which requires respecting T's right to self-determination.
In other words, human beings have the amazing ability to be deontologists and consequentialists at the same time.
Deontologists focus on following the right rules, i.e., respecting people and property rights, fulfilling contractual duties, charging fair prices, demonstrating equal treatment of stakeholders, and providing just, proportionate distribution of benefits and burdens-regardless of legal precedents or adverse consequences for the largest number of people (Petrick and Quinn, 1997; DeGeorge, 2009).
Indeed, for modern moral theorists, moral values can be compared on a common scale, duty for deontologists and utility for utilitarians.
And most deontologists would insist that a payment of money, without more, does not rectify the harm caused by breaching the promisee's entitlement to performance.
(14.) The split between consequentialists, often utilitarians like John Stuart Mill, and deontologists like Kant is the most significant split in modern ethical theory.
The ten commandments are seen to be an early code of conduct for deontologists and the important aspect of this theory is not the consequences of acts but the moral obligations that cause a person to do such acts (Hendrick 2000).
(7) Because this article seeks to further the dialogue bridging theoretical ideas about duty and judicial interpretations, it shall not, except in passing, be concerned with another highly theorized point of view, that of deontologists such as Ernest Weinrib who, as Professor Calnan nicely puts it, "argue that duty is an immutable moral obligation grounded in Kantian and Hegelian notions of abstract right." CALNAN, supra note 1, at 2 (footnote omitted); see Ernest J.
That is, proponents of different views, be they utilitarians, deontologists, virtue theorists, or others, would equally endorse this option.