deorbit


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deorbit

[dē′ȯr·bət]
(aerospace engineering)
To recover a spacecraft from earth orbit by providing a new orbit which intersects the earth's atmosphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
Last, even if a state could track a small piece that belonged to it, the debris is only being deorbited for destruction.
The journey home began after undocking and a four-minute 37-second rocket motor blast - the "deorbit burn" - that set the Soyuz on track for re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere.
They will perform a separation burn to increase the distance from the station before executing a 4-minute, 41-second deorbit burn at 7:19 a.m.
For example, a craft that could patrol and collect small debris could similarly be tasked to deorbit components of satellites belonging to another nation or competitive entity.
(24) Additionally, in 1997, an unmanned Russian Progress resupply spacecraft collided with the Mir space station, causing one module to depressurize and the space station to spiral out of control and almost deorbit. (25) Because the aggregated potential for tort liability threatens the viability of the space flight industry, it militates in favor of a new liability regime.
It will also fly innovative new technologies such as a 'WARP DRiVE' (Water Alcohol Resistojet Propulsion Deorbit Re-entry Velocity Experiment) and electric Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPTs); both 'firsts' to fly on a nanosatellite.
Dr Patrick Harkness of the school of engineering has led the development of the Aerodynamic End Of Life Deorbit System, or AEOLDOS, to help ensure that objects sent into space can be removed from orbit at the end of their operational cycle.
(NASDAQ: ORBC) said the single prototype of its second generation of satellites, launched as a secondary mission payload on the Cargo Re-Supply Services (CRS-1) mission of October 7, 2012, verified various functionality checkouts prior to its deorbit.
"Everyone feels great," Padalka said after the descent module passed through deorbit burn on its journey home and was entering a brief period of silence due to orbital shadow.
Lappas' team is also working on a larger European Union-funded project, called DEORBIT SAIL, for launch in 2014, and an inflatable sail for launch that year or the next.
Space debris orbiting between 200 and 400 kilometers (124 to 249 miles) above Earth may last for only a few months, because the debris will eventually deorbit into Earth's atmosphere and burn up.