deorbit


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deorbit

[dē′ȯr·bət]
(aerospace engineering)
To recover a spacecraft from earth orbit by providing a new orbit which intersects the earth's atmosphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
If it is deorbited into the atmosphere, then as a tertiary benefit to the primary objective of the ADR, secondary pieces that were captured by some form of ADR and destroyed by deorbit would not be problematic.
NASA Television will air live coverage of the Soyuz TMA-17M deorbit burn and landing beginning at 7 a.
If it can deorbit a decommissioned satellite, it can just as easily disable an operational one.
NASDAQ: ORBC) said the single prototype of its second generation of satellites, launched as a secondary mission payload on the Cargo Re-Supply Services (CRS-1) mission of October 7, 2012, verified various functionality checkouts prior to its deorbit.
Everyone feels great," Padalka said after the descent module passed through deorbit burn on its journey home and was entering a brief period of silence due to orbital shadow.
Lappas' team is also working on a larger European Union-funded project, called DEORBIT SAIL, for launch in 2014, and an inflatable sail for launch that year or the next.
Space debris orbiting between 200 and 400 kilometers (124 to 249 miles) above Earth may last for only a few months, because the debris will eventually deorbit into Earth's atmosphere and burn up.
But one doesn't simply shut down a system of satellites without considering the risk of one crashing into a populated area, so deorbit software was developed that would bring down all 66 satellites and incinerate them once they re-entered the Earth's atmosphere.
Like Option 1, this option is the current program, modified to provide funds for space shuttle flights in FY2011 and to deorbit the International Space Station in FY2016.
USA-193, the NRO satellite that was shot down by the United States in February 2008, had been launched in December 2006 and almost immediately was unresponsive to ground control and began to deorbit outside the Pentagon's control.
To deorbit, a shuttle must shed that energy to slow down.