departures


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departures

The number of aircraft takeoffs actually performed in domestic and international scheduled and non-scheduled-passenger/cargo and all-cargo revenue services.
References in classic literature ?
The Departure is not the ship's going away from her port any more than the Landfall can be looked upon as the synonym of arrival.
Lizabetha Prokofievna received confirmatory news from the princess--and alas, two months after the prince's first departure from St.
I look upon my departure from Colonel Lloyd's plantation as one of the most interesting events of my life.
Vanstone's departure, no share in occasioning his wife's departure as well?
This species of aerial car was lined with strong springs and partitions to deaden the shock of departure.
This letter completed, Miss Pinkerton proceeded to write her own name, and Miss Sedley's, in the fly-leaf of a Johnson's Dictionary-- the interesting work which she invariably presented to her scholars, on their departure from the Mall.
Koner, triumphantly demonstrated the feasibility of the journey, its chances of success, the nature of the obstacles existing, the immense advantages of the aerial mode of locomotion, and found fault with nothing but the selected point of departure, which it contended should be Massowah, a small port in Abyssinia, whence James Bruce, in 1768, started upon his explorations in search of the sources of the Nile.
We shall wait here to receive letters from Arthur and his wife, and we shall time our departure for Italy accordingly.
These scuttles then were protected against the shock of departure by plates let into solid grooves, which could easily be opened outward by unscrewing them from the inside.
But in the Klondike, such was its hilarious sorrow at the departure of its captain, that for twenty-four hours no wheels revolved.
On hearing of Emily's sudden departure, she had been (as the maid reported) "much shocked and quite at a loss to understand what it meant.
A vessel was setting sail for Algiers, on board of which the bustle usually attending departure prevailed.