depletion

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depletion

[də′plē·shən]
(ecology)
Using a resource, such as water or timber, faster than it is replenished.
(electronics)
Reduction of the charge-carrier density in a semiconductor below the normal value for a given temperature and doping level.
(nucleonics)
The percentage reduction in the quantity of fissionable atoms in the fuel assemblies or fuel mixture that occurs during operation of a nuclear reactor.

depletion

see ENVIRONMENTAL DEPLETION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The decline in oil production of a well, oil field, or geographic area can lead to depletion of oil resources.
Company president Martin Roper said that depletions growth was bolstered by Samuel Adams Seasonals, Twisted Tea and Angry Orchard, offsetting decline in other styles.
Providing information on over 700 commonly prescribed drugs known to deplete the body of its natural nutrients, Nutrient Depletions gives easy-to-use recommendations on nutrient replenishment.
When the mean depletion efficiency was <90% for 3 runs, no further depletions were performed.
The only statistically significant separation in 1999 was between sunflower and safflower, which had the highest soil water depletion values, and dry pea and barley, with the lowest soil water depletions.
The greatest depletions occurred over Siberia, where ozone concentrations dropped 35 percent below the values observed in 1979, before substantial ozone destruction had begun.
This line is perfect for the millions of people who faithfully take their prescription medications every day and may experience the depletion of valuable nutrients from their system.
We achieved depletions growth of 7% in the third quarter, and total depletions grew to 8.
As the concentrations grow, ozone depletions should worsen.
introduced BACARDI SILVER RAZ (raspberry flavored) and BACARDI SILVER O3 (orange flavored), which led to a twenty percent increase in depletions.
reported a second quarter core product depletions increase of 13% as compared to the second quarter of 2009.
These lower-stratosphere depletions began at the same time particles from the eruption of Chile's Hudson Volcano reached Antarctica.