deponent


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

deponent

Law
a. a person who makes an affidavit
b. a person, esp a witness, who makes a deposition
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The participants' profile appears in Chart 1 and it merely aims to characterize the deponents of the research.
Consequently, the morpho-syntax of voice makes space for deponent verbs, which include "notional" middle predicates, i.
Objection, vague," or "objection, ambiguous"--Before most depositions, the questioning lawyer typically explains some basic ground rules to the deponent.
My outside counsel's associate, who was coordinating discovery with the plaintiffs wanted to provide a deponent.
He ruled: "The right to refuse to answer certain deposition questions does not entitle a deponent to 'refuse to appear for any deposition whatsoever'.
25[3] ("There is no rule that would prevent corporate counsel, or even a corporation's litigation counsel, from serving as a Rule 30(h)(6) deponent.
48, I am required to instruct the deponent not to answer questions which call for official information outside the scope of this authorization or seek information which is otherwise prohibited from disclosure.
Contract award: Banking services of the Deponent Bank of the Public Enterprise for State Roads for 2 years.
11 are added, dealing with scheduling depositions, appropriate questions, objections, and deponent instructions.
Users of this book need to know the basic framework of the Latin language: male, female, and neuter, first, second, and third conjugations, regular and deponent verbs, declensions, and so on.
They mob denounced him as a "damned Tory, [and] began pelting him with Stones, one of which struck the Deponent [Benson] on his Forehead.
If an apex deponent refuses to appear, the party seeking the deposition may file a Rule 37 motion to compel the deposition.