depreciation

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depreciation,

in accountingaccounting,
classification, analysis, and interpretation of the financial, or bookkeeping, records of an enterprise. The professional who supplies such services is known as an accountant. Auditing is an important branch of accounting.
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, reduction in the value of fixed or capital assets, as by use, damage, weathering, or obsolescence. It can be estimated according to a number of methods. In the straight-line method, depreciation is simply seen as a function of time; the cost of the asset, minus its value as scrap, is divided by an estimate of its life. Other methods distribute depreciation over the life of the asset by gradually increasing, or gradually diminishing, installments. The resale value of a machine generally declines most quickly during its early years; thus its depreciation is measured in decreasing installments. The opposite is true of rights of limited duration, such as copyrights and leaseholds, whose value depreciates most quickly as their date of expiration approaches. The technical name for the depreciation of such nonmaterial rights is amortization. The problem of calculating depreciation has special importance because of the need for accuracy in income tax returns. Failure to make allowance for depreciation results in overestimating income. Depreciation of money is brought about by a decline in the price of a particular currency in terms of other currencies, thereby lowering the foreign exchange value of the first currency.

Bibliography

See J. D. Coughlan, Depreciation (1969); R. P. Brief, ed., Depreciation and Capital Maintenance (1984).

Depreciation

The reduction in the value or worth of an asset, such as a building, through physical deterioration over time, and general obsolescence.

depreciation

[di‚prē·shē′ā·shən]
(industrial engineering)
Loss of value due to physical deterioration.

depreciation

Economics a decrease in the exchange value of currency against gold or other currencies brought about by excess supply of that currency under conditions of fluctuating exchange rates
References in classic literature ?
This paradox, though different in form, is not really different from the remark which is often made in modern times by those who would depreciate either the methods of education commonly employed, or the standard attained--that 'there is no true education among us.
7008, which depreciates slightly from previous trading day, September 30.
However, when silence prevails in the exporters' camp, you can conclude, without checking the statistics, that the lira depreciates.
72,000 crore, and that for every rupee that depreciates, they lose Rs 8000 crore.
With domestic demand expected to recover in 2010, Saudi Arabia may be at a risk of higher inflation if the US dollar depreciates further.