depressed

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depressed

1. suffering from depression
2. characterized by relative economic hardship, such as unemployment
3. (of plant parts) flattened as though pressed from above
4. Zoology flattened from top to bottom
References in classic literature ?
With steady head and hand, he depressed the forward horizontal rudder--just recklessly enough and not a fraction more--and the monoplane dived head foremost and sharply down the void.
He reefed hastily to the uttermost, and at the same time depressed the angle of his flight to meet that upward surge.
These were the reflections which now troubled Crayford, and which presented him, after his rescue, in the strangely inappropriate character of a depressed and anxious man.
As compared to their non-depressed counterparts, depressed fathers are nearly four times more likely to spank their children, claims a study.
THE family of a Swansea rugby player who took his own life after becoming clinically depressed after an injury have called for doctors to "help save lives" by informing loved ones of the condition in future.
Objective: To assess outcomes in surgically managed patients with depressed skull fractures and associated moderate to severe head injury.
Objective: The objective of the current study was to compare the perceptions of depressed and non-depressed lactating mothers regarding breast feeding.
While comparing two generations, the study suggested that grandchildren with depressed parents had twice the risk of MDD compared with non-depressed parents, as well as increased risk for disruptive disorder, substance dependence, suicidal ideation or gesture and poorer functioning.
I think our study highlights the importance of screening for depression in the primary care setting--and if someone's depressed, they need to be treated," said Dr.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Depressive thoughts are maintained for longer periods of time for people with depressed mood, and this extended duration may reduce the amount of information that these individuals can hold in their memory, new research demonstrates.
Adult women who are depressed are more likely to be obese than women who are not depressed at any age.