depth finder


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Related to depth finder: depth sounder

depth finder

[′depth ‚fīnd·ər]
(engineering)
A radar or ultrasonic instrument for measuring the depth of the sea.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jigging: Determine depth and location of a kokanee school with depth finder, lower Buzz Bomb, Nordic or similar lure into the school, then twitch the rod tip up and down.
Being patient while you search out your deep drop position is key, and it requires a working and adequate depth finder. You need to be able to see bottom contours and mark blobs offish in order to have the best chance.
This is important because aquatic vegetation is the Florida depth finder.
A decent depth finder and a few public numbers can get you started.
Use your depth finder to determine how far up to put the bobber.
Use your depth finder, even in shallow water, and especially when you're outside almost any creek or indentation into the shoreline, to find them.
These spots may or may not be noticeable on a depth finder. The best way to find these spots is to mark where a fish is caught and then explore the area more closely.
As you pass under the power lines, make a few cross-river circling passes, watch your depth finder, and you'll mark the hole.
If schools of shad also show up on the depth finder, the chances of finding bass become even better.
Most folks think you need a big rock, wreck or large outcropping to find gags, but sometimes the best bites come off what reads as just a good hard bottom off the depth finder. You might have to hit 8 to 10 spots before hitting pay dirt, but the payoff is worth it.
It's easy to dial in this depth with a depth finder and then pick the bait that gets there.