Derby

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Derby

(där`bē, dûr`–), city and unitary authority (1991 pop. 218,026), central England, on the Derwent River. It was formerly county seat of DerbyshireDerbyshire
county (1991 pop. 915,000), 1,016 sq mi (2,632 sq km), central England. The county seat is Matlock; Derby, the former county seat, is now administratively independent of the county.
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 but became administratively independent of the county in 1997. Manufactures include automobiles and airplane engines, pottery (see Derby wareDerby ware
, English china produced at Derby since about 1750, when William Duesbury opened a pottery there. The china was close in style to contemporary Chelsea ware and Bow ware, whose factories Derby absorbed in the 1770s.
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), synthetic textiles, beer, machinery, and chemicals. The city is also an important rail center. Derby was a Roman settlement and, in the 9th cent., one of the Five Boroughs of the Danes. England's first silk mill was built there in 1718. Derby is the birthplace of the philosopher Herbert SpencerSpencer, Herbert,
1820–1903, English philosopher, b. Derby. In 1848 he moved to London, where he was an editor at The Economist and wrote his first major book, Social Statics (1851), which tried to establish a natural basis for political action.
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. Noteworthy are the Cathedral of All Saints, with its Perpendicular tower (1509–27), the Roman Catholic Church of St. Mary (designed by A. W. PuginPugin, Augustus Charles
, 1762–1832, English writer on medieval architecture, b. France. His writings and drawings furnished a mass of working material for the architects of the Gothic revival. Among them is Specimens of Gothic Architecture (2 vol., 1821–23).
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 in 1838), the arboretum, the chapel of St. Mary of the Bridge, and a grammar school founded in 1160. The Univ. of Derby and a teacher-training college are also located in Derby.

Derby

(där`bē), English horse race, instituted (1780) by the 12th earl of Derby and held annually at Epsom Downs, near London. The race is open only to three-year-old colts and fillies that must be entered when yearlings. The original course is still used; it is one yard longer than one and one-half miles. Hundreds of thousands of spectators view the race each year. Other well-known races, notably the Kentucky Derby (dûr`bē), held each year since 1875 at Churchill Downs, Louisville, Ky., have been named for the English classic.

Derby

(dûr`bē), city (1990 pop. 12,199), New Haven co., SW Conn., at the confluence of the Naugatuck and Housatonic rivers, opposite Shelton; founded 1642 as a trading post, inc. as a city 1893. Its copper industry and pin manufactures date from the 1830s.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Derby

 

a country town in Great Britain, on the Derwent River. Administrative center of the county of Derbyshire. Population, 220,000 (1970). It is a railroad junction and has railroad workshops. Automobiles and aircraft are manufactured, and there are other branches of transport machine building. It has a textile industry (cotton, silk, and chemical-fiber cloth), and there is production of knitted, lace, and leather goods and porcelain articles. There are specimens of architecture of the 14th to 19th century (St. Peter’s Church, Town Hall, and the cathedral). It has an art gallery.


Derby

 

a horse-racing event of purebred three-year-old Thoroughbreds over a distance of 2,400 m (on foreign racetracks, 2,414 m, or 1.5 miles). The derbies were initiated by Lord Derby in 1778 in England and were introduced in Russia in 1886. In the USSR derby competitions are known as the All-Union Grand Prix. In a number of countries, the USSR included, the term is also applied to the season’s main event for four-year-old trotters and in the Federal Republic of Germany, to the leading steeplechase.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

derby

[′dər·bē]
(metallurgy)
A large, usually cylindrical piece of primary metal, whose weight may exceed 100 pounds (45 kilograms), formed by bomb reduction.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

darby, derby slicker

1. A float tool used in plastering, either wood or metal, about 4 in. (10 cm) wide and about 42 in. (approx. 1 m) long, with two handles; used to float or level the plaster base coat prior to application of the finish coat, or to level the plaster finish coat before floating or troweling.
2. A hand-manipulated straightedge usually 3 to 8 ft (1 to 2.5 m) long, used in the early-stage leveling operations of concrete finishing to supplement floating.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Derby

classic annual race at Epsom Downs. [Br. Cult.: Brewer Dictionary, 276]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Derby

1
Earl of. title of Edward George Geoffrey Smith Stanley. 1799--1869, British statesman; Conservative prime minister (1852; 1858--59; 1866--68)

Derby

2
1. the. an annual horse race run at Epsom Downs, Surrey, since 1780: one of the English flat-racing classics
2. any of various other horse races
3. local Derby a football match between two teams from the same area

Derby

1. a city in central England, in Derby unitary authority, Derbyshire: engineering industries (esp aircraft engines and railway rolling stock); university (1991). Pop.: 229 407 (2001)
2. a unitary authority in central England, in Derbyshire. Pop.: 233 200 (2003 est.). Area: 78 sq. km (30 sq. miles)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Of course, while the South Wales game's position in our top 10 of British derbies may be up for debate, it's difficult to maintain that it should have a world presence.
So, what'sWelsh for "El Classico?" TOP BRITISH DERBY GAMES CHRIS WATHAN looks at the biggest derbies in British football and sees which ones really have the wow factor.
"But, we don't like to run into other people's derbies."
I loved derbies as a player and still love them now.
16: 'Call him It' - Everton's top scorer in Premier League Merseyside derbies.
Harvey had an eventful first season of Derbies as Gary Stevens gave him a victorious start as boss with the only goal in a League Cup third round tie at Anfield on October 28 1987.
Just a couple of months into Kendall's second spell he was involved in four Derbies in the space of 18 days which included the memorable 4-4 draw that proved to be Kenny Dalglish's final match of his first stint in charge of Liverpool and climaxed with a 1-0 FA Cup second replay success for the Blues courtesy of a Dave Watson goal.
I played in five Merseyside derbies, three for Everton and two for Liverpool.
I played in 23 Merseyside derby matches from 1977 to 1990 and won all three Merseyside derbies last season.
I''ve made more appearances in Premier League Merseyside derbies for Everton than any other player, 17 in total, being on the winning side just four times.
32 I'm no stranger to these matches having worn the Red shirt in 29 Merseyside derbies and scoring three goals all being penalties, although I did miss one penalty in the 1976 Merseyside derby.
35 I've played in 12 Merseyside derbies scoring four goals, I've also played in a Manchester derby scoring a dramatic late winner in one too.