dermatosis

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dermatosis

[‚dər·mə′tō·səs]
(medicine)
Any skin disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Akalin, "Is diabetic Dermopathy a sign for severe neuropathy in patients with diabetes mellitus?
Diabetic dermopathy is found in 30% - 60% of patients and is the most common finding in diabetics.
Nestle, "Successful treatment of three cases of nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy with extracorporeal photopheresis," British Journal of Dermatology, vol.
Melanoma, seborrheic keratoses, acanthosis nigricans, melasma, diabetic dermopathy, tinea versicolor, and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.
In literature, there are a few acropathy case studies reporting that acropathy develops independent of thyroid hormones without classical radiological findings, and it is not accompanied by the findings of ophthalmopathy and dermopathy (1-4).
Histopathologic comparison of nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy and scleromyxedema.
However, if you notice a sudden appearance of such spots, it may be a skin problem called diabetic dermopathy. Diabetes can cause changes in the small blood vessels, which can appear on the skin as light brown patches similar to age spots.
Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy).
Graves' disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disorder characterized by hyperthyroidism with diffuse goiter and a possible presence of extra-thyroid manifestations such as eye changes (thyroid ophthalmopathy), skin change (dermopathy) and fingertips change (acropachy) [1, 2].
This dermopathy of Graves' disease usually occurs over the dorsum of the legs or feet and is termed localized or pretibial myxedema.
Guttate psoriasis should be differentiated from diabetic dermopathy, also called shin spots, which typically begin as dull red, scaly papules or plaques and later develop into bilateral asymmetrical circumscribed shallow pigmented scars and/or brownish macular lesions with a fine scale.
Originally known as nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy (NFD) because of its dominant cutaneous findings, the nomenclature was revised in recent years to reflect an increased understanding of its systemic effects.