desalting

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desalting

[dē′sȯl·tiŋ]
(chemical engineering)
The process of extracting inorganic salts from oil.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Water that's been desalted through reverse osmosis contains a unique composition which will induce changes in the chemistry and ecology of aquifers and natural water systems it enters," says Avner Vengosh, associate professor of earth and ocean sciences at Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment.
Peak force values were significantly different between brining processes at each stage but were not significantly different between fermented and desalted stages.
Eisenstat and Fabian [43, 44] used salt stock of 16% and desalted stock of 3.8% salt to show that direct sunlight caused severe bleaching (loss of characteristic color) in a matter of hours unless the cucumber pickles were completely submerged in the 16% salt stock brine.
Chroma was significantly higher in the finished product for each treatment than in the fermented and desalted stages.
At least 0.3% Ca[Cl.sub.2] was included in the fermentation brine of both treatments, so it is not surprising that the mesocarp firmness of desalted cucumbers was not significantly different from the fermented cucumbers.
Finished hamburger dill chip products from both brining treatments were considerably lower in mesocarp peak force (N) than the fermented and desalted cucumbers.
In the production of finished pickle products, desalted cucumbers were separated from the desalting water before being cut and packed with freshly made cover liquor containing sufficient NaCl, Ca[Cl.sub.2], vinegar, and flavors, such as dill, to equilibrate to each processor's desired formulation.
These differences between brining processes were first detected at the fermented stage and were detected thereafter at the desalted and finished product stages (Figure 3).
The effect of the time spent in bulk storage on texture became more discernible as the cucumbers were processed into desalted and finished product samples with 0.8 [+ or -] 0.2 N and 1.1 [+ or -] 0.2 N lower peak forces for every 100 days, respectively.
Polygalacturonase, an enzyme known for softening of cucumber pickles [27-29], was assayed, but no significant differences between brining processes (P = 0.4470) nor correlations between PG and mesocarp firmness were found for fermented, desalted, or finished product samples in this study (Table 2).
Although the desalted, NaCl brined cucumbers contained significantly more lactic and acetic acids than the desalted Ca[Cl.sub.2] brined cucumbers, the pH values did not differ significantly, likely due to the buffering capacity of the system.
The chemical compositions of fermented, desalted, and finished cucumber pickles produced with the typical, NaCl-dependent commercial process and the alternative Ca[Cl.sub.2] brining process are shown in Table 1.