desktop browser


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desktop browser

A Web browser used in a desktop or laptop computer (see Web browser). Contrast with mobile Web browser.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Several developers tell me they have successfully converted desktop browsers based on the Chromium code base using the Desktop Bridge.
And chances are you're not using a traditional keyboard and mouse, which desktop browser makers could count on you to have.
That's history now, because visiting an Instagram photo or video page via desktop browser and clicking the new share button to the right of the photo (directly below the comments button) allows users to see the embed code.
For the first time, the majority of customers doing their banking online are using a mobile device rather than a traditional desktop browser. The remarkable growth in mobile banking is all the more significant given that ASB's mobile app was only launched in 2011.'
According to the latest figures fromStatCounter, Internet Explorer is now the second most popular browser with 30 percent of the global desktop browser market.
The desktop browser space is becoming increasingly competitive as Google's Chrome and Mozilla's Firefox continue to eat away market share from Microsoft's Internet Explorer.
While in the webtop application, users can run Android applications in a larger window, browse websites with a Firefox desktop browser, send instant messages, check email, access files and make phone calls.
The desktop browser is being tested internally among employees at present, Baidu spokesman Kaiser Kuo said in an interview yesterday.
The new Opera Mobile 10 beta for Windows Mobile has a similar look to the Opera 10 desktop browser and Opera Mini 5 beta.
In the call center space, consider a multimodal application where customers can view instructional or troubleshooting graphics on a desktop browser while a coordinated voice application on the phone talks them through the process.
The figures here compare the Ehrman Medical Library's Unbound Medicine interface on a desktop browser and a wireless browser.
When a document becomes available, any Web client, including a standard desktop browser, is capable of accessing it.