despot

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despot

1. Politics an absolute or tyrannical ruler; autocrat or tyrant
2. History a title borne by numerous persons of rank in the later Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman Empires
References in periodicals archive ?
This honor is achieved through governing of the world in compliance with divine wisdom and love, and not despotically.
In another of his tweets, KeneE- underlined that Davutoy-lu is no different from Turkey's rulers of the past who despotically ruled the country, given his discrimination against various segments of the society.
Revolutionary legislators in France legitimized their disapproval of the traditional family structure--inextricably linked to the monarchy they detested--by ensuring that "the contractual association of free individuals was now supposed to replace the patriarchal family despotically controlled by the father as the fundamental unit of the new polity" (Hunt 42).
If a performance or scheme despotically prevails over the option and self-determination of individuals, therefore breaching their capacity to self-govern (as a unified group of citizens), then they are unacceptable.
But if we are to reject slavishness, why should we prefer sharing in rule with others over ruling them despotically? As Garver sees it, Aristotle's answer to this question varies along with the perspective he takes on politics in different modes of inquiry.
The province in the region was despotically ruled by the Sikhs followers of an Indian founded religion under the reign of Maharaja Ranjeet Singh who ruled for fifty years.2 It was during his time that the region sought influence of Zamidars and Jageerdars for the support of the ruling power.3
Certainly, we cannot believe, with the Chorus, that Dalila is merely a manifest serpent and that if men would only rule their wives more despotically nothing would go amiss in the world.
Centeno found that South American states might have acted despotically towards their citizens, but have greatly lagged behind in their capacity to coordinate their societies.
Popes and kings alike ruled arbitrarily and despotically in the name of religion.
Today, democracy is so entrenched that there is no chance the government would act despotically in these ways.
Murray and Dollery (2006) comment that administrators sometimes acted despotically, without regard to logic and fairness, and the cost incurred of organisational restructures were often far in excess of any derived benefit.