destraction

destraction

[di′strak·shən]
(chemical engineering)
A high-pressure technique for separating high-boiling or nonvolatile material by dissolving it with application of supercritical gases.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even Japanese citizens living adjacent to Hiroshima at first did not realise the degree of destraction (Nakazawa 2010) unleashed by 'Little Boy', the atomic weapon that displayed none of the characteristics associated with the name: childlike and innocent.
Contract award: Destraction of unlawful built buildings.
Clark, Innovation: Mapping the Winds of Creative Destraction, 14 RES.
Nor was it the loss of Main Street, the destraction of the courthouse, the control of the Permian Basin by eastern giants ...
BRYANSBURN are currently only one place above the relegation zone in Amateur League 1B and a trip to top flight Malachians may well prove a welcome destraction and a decent day out - but nothing more I'm afraid.
Usage of the common mango agroindustrial waste (mangifera indica L.) in the destraction of fermentables sugars
Richard Overy, professor of history at the University of Exeter, thinks there are reasons to welcome the publication in English, observing: 'Jorg Friedrich's book has come at a time when serious scholarly interest in the bombing war has finally emerged after decades in which it was simply the preserve of air buffs and popular histories.' Adam Tooze of Jesus College, Cambridge and author of The Wages of Destraction: The Making and Breaking of the Nazi Economy (2006), hopes its publication may force Britain to reassess its wartime role.
Secrest, When the Great Spirit Died: The Destraction of the California Indians, 1850-1860 (Sanger, CA: Word Dancer Press, 2003), p.
Destraction and degradation of habitat is the number-one danger, threatening 87% of these vulnerable birds.
So if nothing else Mr Bush will be setting eyes on a couple of weapons of mass destraction at last.
BAPS (15), WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRACTION (15) CULTURE-CLASH comedy about two young black wannabes (Halle Berry and Natalie Deselle) swept into the swanky mansion of a dying white millionaire (Martin Landau).
The rapid decline in power of the Bourbon monarchs of Spain and Portugal in comparison with France and the severe pressure put upon them in the East by the Protestant powers, the Netherlands and Great Britain, the bitter quarrels in France between Jansenist and Jesuit, between Gallicanism and Ultramontanism, all played their part in destraction of the Jesuit mission built on the Valignano-Ricci perception of Christianity to Confucianism" (p.