lesion

(redirected from destructive lesion)
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lesion

any structural change in a bodily part resulting from injury or disease

lesion

[′lē·zhən]
(biology)
A structural or functional alteration due to injury or disease.
(cell and molecular biology)
A damaged site in a gene, chromosome, or protein molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vasculitis mimics: cocaine-induced midline destructive lesions.
The imaging demonstrated disseminated disease with a destructive lesion of the right ilium and abnormal soft tissue in the bilateral perinephric space.
The radiographic appearance of osteoarticular tuberculosis can mimic metastatic tumors or primary osseous lesions such as eosinophilic granuloma, especially if multiple destructive lesions are present.
This clinical entity is rare, but it should be strongly suspected in a patient who presents with a destructive lesion of the vertebra and a retropharyngeal mass that extends across the midline.
CT of the temporal bones revealed a destructive lesion of the fight petrous apex, and MRI showed a 3.
Areview of his original computed tomography (CT) scan (figure) revealed the presence of a large, destructive lesion that involved the sinonasal area and extended into the anterior cranial fossa, a significant degree of associated vasogenic edema in the adjacent frontal lobes of the brain, and signs of hemorrhage.
Radiographic images will often show a destructive lesion with tooth displacement, but they are nonspecific.
We also review the pathophysiology and differential diagnosis of a cocaine-induced midline destructive lesion (CIMDL), and we discuss alternatives to the use of cocaine in rhinologic practice.
As they are bone destructive lesions, they are characterised better by CT.
Emphysema is defined by chronic abnormal inflammatory cell response resulting in destruction of small airway and alveolar walls, with coalescent destructive lesions producing larger cavities resulting in bullous disease.
4,6) Gums are locally destructive lesions in the skin, liver, bones, and other organs.
Stein, "Benign neoplastic and nonneoplastic destructive lesions in the long bones of the hand," Surgery, Gynecology & Obstetrics, vol.