deuteride


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deuteride

[′düd·ə‚rīd]
(chemistry)
A hydride in which the hydrogen is deuterium.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Experts say uranium deuteride has no civil or military use other than making nuclear arms.
Beaver, "Isotope effect in the vibrational frequency spectra and specific heats of sodium hydride and deuteride," The Journal of Chemical Physics, vol.
This enabled astronomers to measure the levels of hydrogen deuteride and obtain the weight of the disk with the highest precision yet.
Mark Fitzpatrick, of the International Institute for Strategic Studies think tank, said the IAEA probably had more information about Iranian experiments using uranium deuteride.
Experts also mentioned to the British newspaper that uranium deuteride was the material used in Pakistan's nuclear bomb, from where Iran obtained its blueprint.
Uranium deuteride is reportedly the material used in Pakistan's bomb, from where Iran obtained its blueprint.
Experts also mentioned to the British newspaper that Uranium deuteride is t= he material used in Pakistan's nuclear weaponry bomb, from where Iran obtai= ned its blueprint.
I got my tenure, the Berlin Wall fell, I took another job and moved to California with my wife, and in the silos of the night stockpiles of lithium deuteride were destroyed.
Since the first vibrational measurements of dilute H in [beta]-phase palladium deuteride (139), isotope dilution neutron spectroscopy has developed into a particularly powerful technique for elucidating the nature of hydrogen-hydrogen interactions in materials.
This utilised X-Rays from a fission bomb to detonate a deuterium-tritium mixture derived from lithium-6 deuteride. This was the 'Biggest Bang', the most devastating explosive to have been invented.
They include using uranium deuteride to produce a short burst of neutrons (the only use for which is to initiate the chain reaction in a fission bomb), producing uranium metal and shaping it into nuclear-sized components (useful only for making the metal core of a fission bomb), using special detonators to produce an implosive spherical shock wave (needed to compress the core before setting off the chain reaction in a fission bomb), and testing high voltage firing equipment to insure that it can fire detonators over long distances (needed for nuclear weapon testing).