Deutschmark

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Deutschmark

, Deutsche Mark
the former standard monetary unit of Germany, divided into 100 pfennigs; replaced by the euro in 2002: until 1990 the standard monetary unit of West Germany
References in periodicals archive ?
Deutschemarks were abandoned in favour of the euro in January 2002 but could still be exchanged for legal tender.
By the same token, if the Germans have overthrownthe deutschemark for a European currency, that also must be to the benefit of the prevailing coalition of interests.
Euroskeptics once warned the euro wouldn't be as "hard" as the Deutschemark.
A hard-currency policy centred around a close link with the Deutschemark has enhanced confidence in the guilder and secured low interest rates.
The world today is dominated by three currencies: the dollar, the deutschemark, and the yen.
Indeed, during the fixed-rate era, a preponderance of devaluations occurred (only the deutschemark and Dutch guilder were revalued upwards) and this put pressure on the U.
The decline in the Deutschemark value of each year's cashflow will be broadly proportionate to the decline in the dollar.
9 Main imports, 1992 (per cent of total merchandise imports): Food 11 Raw materials and semi-finished goods 15 Finished goods 73 of which: Primary products 13 End products 60 Other imports 1 Total 100 THE CURRENCY Monetary unit: Deutschemark Currency units per US$, average of daily figures: Year 1993 1.
But the link with the Deutschemark has caused tensions in the context of divergent cyclical positions between Germany and the United Kingdom, which is still Ireland's main trading partner.
Signals from these variables were not always mutually consistent in 1992: the effective schilling appreciation and the inverted yield curve pointed to a restrictive thrust of policy, while -- using current inflation as a proxy for unobserved long-run inflation expectations -- real long-term interest rates declined as nominal interest rates on Deutschemark bonds edged down and inflation in Austria picked up.
Because they see it as the only practical alternative to a de facto Deutschemark zone.
The recent appreciation of the deutschemark is likely to slow growth and reduce inflation in 1990 whilst the recent depreciation of the yen is expected to produce the opposite result.

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