developmental toxicity


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Related to developmental toxicity: reproductive toxicity

developmental toxicity

[di‚vel·əp¦ment·əl tak′sis·ə·dē]
(medicine)
Adverse effects on the developing child which result from exposure to toxic chemicals or other toxic substances, can include birth defects, low birth weight, and functional or behavioral weaknesses that show up as the child develops.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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4-5 hpf was chosen as the start time of exposure as this covers the same development stages as in the developmental toxicity studies performed according to the OECD 414 guideline in rat and rabbit (Beekhuijzen et al., 2015).
To satisfy the need to consider multiple effects (e.g., cancer and noncancer) across multiple life stages and to reduce the overall number of animals required for separate studies of these end points, we propose the following experimental design that integrates traditional cancer guidelines with more recent proposals of OECD and NTP for studying reproductive and developmental toxicity. This new integrated experimental design aims to maximize the end points measured for each animal, thus reducing the overall number of animals produced and utilized, in accordance with the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement) (European Union 2010).
Studies with other species also showed developmental toxicity caused by metolachlor and its metabolites.
The drug caused minor developmental toxicity in rat fetuses that was reversed after birth, and shortening of the gestation period.
Tanaka, "Reproductive and developmental toxicity studies of sodium hyaluronate (SL-1010) (III).
Pretreatment with Periodate - Oxidized Adenosine Enhances Developmental Toxicity of Inorganic Arsenic in Mice.
In addition to elevated cancer risks and disruption of the endocrine system, increasing evidence supports developmental toxicity from prenatal or early postnatal exposure to PAHs.
Things like formaldehyde, naphtha, methylene chloride, and perchloroethylene are highly toxic to humans, including carcinogenicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, respiratory irritation and acute toxicity.
Due to the number of new substances coming into use every year and the increasing amounts of chemicals, which are introduced into the environment, there is a high demand for a rapid, reliable and cost-effective method for detection of developmental toxicity. To meet this challenge various in vitro techniques have been established additional to in vivo animal testing.
The 27 chapters by a group of North American pharmacists, physicians, and nurses specializing in maternal-fetal medicine provide information often lacking in pharmacy training, including discussion of physiologic changes, developmental toxicity, drug use and lactation, use of over-the-counter medications, teratology risk assessment and counseling, drug therapy for complications unique to pregnancy, and treatment of common chronic diseases such as depression, epilepsy, infectious disease, nausea and vomiting, and autoimmune diseases in pregnancy.
The current study was performed to confirm the developmental toxicity of the ionic liquid 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C10mim]Cl).
Short- to mid-term exposures have shown neurotoxicity, developmental toxicity, immunotoxicity and endocrine disruption leading to toxic end points.

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