devise

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devise

Law
1. 
a. a disposition of property by will
b. the property so transmitted
2. a will or clause in a will disposing of real property
References in periodicals archive ?
In the 1961 financial Award devisable federal revenues were divided into both East and West Pakistan on the ratio of 54 and 46.
(43.) See Madow, supra note 41; Tate, supra note 40, at 23 ("[E]ven if the prospect of inter vivos publicity rights encouraged celebrities (or would-be celebrities) to work harder, it does not follow that making those rights devisable or descendible would have substantially increased that incentive.").
Stewart says there are a lot of numbers featured on the album's artwork - "like the price tag on the Mad Hatter's hat" - that are all devisable by three.
We can begin to see the specific legal context of Donne's satire by considering the following call for legal reform from earlier in the sixteenth century: "Where by the common laws of this realm, lands, tenements, and hereditaments be not devisable by testament, nor ought to be transferred from one to another, but by solemn livery and seisin, matter of record, writing sufficient made bona fide, without covin or fraud, yet nevertheless divers and sundry imaginations, subtle inventions, and practices have been used, whereby the hereditaments of this realm have been conveyed from one to another by fraudulent feoffments, fines, recoveries, and other assurances craftily made." (6) This is the preamble of the 1536 Statute of Uses (28 Hen.
[section] 44-5.-40 ("Future interests or estates are descendible, devisable, and alienable in the same manner as estates in possession."); RESTATEMENT (FIRST) OF PROP.
Any alphabet devisable by man will have only a limited number of letters (Leibniz here supposes the Latin alphabet of twenty-four).
(115) That is, privacy interests have been viewed as personal, non-assignable and incapable of passing to heirs; in contrast, rights of property can be assigned, licensed, transmitted inter vivos and are devisable post-mortem.
A complete administrative vacuum, as befell Kosovo and East Timor, makes a compelling case for executive international authority, but post-Taliban Afghanistan shows that such authority is not a necessity: local interim arrangements may also be devisable. Much will depend, as it did in the case of Afghanistan, on how much of the cost and responsibility of governance relevant third parties are willing to shoulder and how feasible direct rule is.