Devour

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What does it mean when you dream about devouring something?

Being eaten in a dream can reflect our feelings of being “eaten up” by someone or by the demands of our lives. If we are the devourer, then it can indicate that we are hungering for something, or that we are possessive. Being swallowed whole by a large creature is a widespread shamanic motif for personal transformation (e.g., Jonah and the whale). (See also Eating, Hunger).

References in classic literature ?
He had often heard that shipwrecked persons had died through having eagerly devoured too much food.
In the morning the jailer brought him fresh provisions -- he had already devoured those of the previous day; he ate these listening anxiously for the sound, walking round and round his cell, shaking the iron bars of the loophole, restoring vigor and agility to his limbs by exercise, and so preparing himself for his future destiny.
The King will then glide over something soft, which he likes very much, and he will be so pleased with that that he will not devour you.
Every year you must bring me from among your people twelve youths and twelve maidens, that I may devour them.
They devoured my little daughter, my child, my only child!
One night when Taug lay sleepless looking up at the starry heavens he recalled the strange things that Tarzan once had suggested to him--that the bright spots were the eyes of the meat-eaters waiting in the dark of the jungle sky to leap upon Goro, the moon, and devour him.
You have devoured all when you were standing godmother.
This unhappy bird can alone furnish it; and when he is once devoured, the captain will come to his senses.
The thought that these human fiends would devour him when the dance was done caused him not a single qualm of horror or disgust.
It is the day when we annually draw lots to see which of the youths and maids of Athens shall go to be devoured by the horrible Minotaur!"
This fault the Lacedaemonians did not fall into, for they made their children fierce by painful labour, as chiefly useful to inspire them with courage: though, as we have already often said, this is neither the only thing nor the principal thing necessary to attend to; and even with respect to this they may not thus attain their end; for we do not find either in other animals, or other nations, that courage necessarily attends the most cruel, but rather the milder, and those who have the dispositions of lions: for there are many people who are eager both to kill men and to devour human flesh, as the Achaeans and Heniochi in Pontus, and many others in Asia, some of whom are as bad, others worse than these, who indeed live by tyranny, but are men of no courage.
Colin held out his hand with a sort of flushed royal shyness but his eyes quite devoured her face.