dharma

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dharma

(där`mə). In HinduismHinduism
, Western term for the religious beliefs and practices of the vast majority of the people of India. One of the oldest living religions in the world, Hinduism is unique among the world religions in that it had no single founder but grew over a period of 4,000 years in
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, dharma is the doctrine of the religious and moral rights and duties of each individual; it generally refers to religious duty, but may also mean social order, right conduct, or simply virtue. Sacred law is the codification of dharma, and Hinduism itself is also called Sanatana Dharma [the eternal dharma]. In BuddhismBuddhism
, religion and philosophy founded in India c.525 B.C. by Siddhartha Gautama, called the Buddha. There are over 300 million Buddhists worldwide. One of the great world religions, it is divided into two main schools: the Theravada or Hinayana in Sri Lanka and SE Asia, and
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, dharma has two distinct meanings: it refers to religious truth, namely Buddhist teaching as the highest truth; it is also used as a technical term to denote a constituent element of experience, or any existing thing or phenomenon.

dharma

See CASTE.

Dharma

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

The Hindu understanding of the word "dharma" is difficult to translate. Roughly, it refers to the order of the world and the moral behavior of those in it. But that doesn't really capture its all-encompassing meaning. Hinduism is very comfortable with things that really can't be pinned down with a concise definition. After all, creation came before language, so it is only logical to think there are limitations in expression. Dharma includes all that there is, so it naturally follows that the basic concept of the word has fuzzy outer edges that can't quite be contained by scientific categories.

In Buddhism, however, the word is easier to grasp. The Buddha used the word to refer to the doctrine he taught, beginning with the Four Noble Truths, the Eightfold Path, and the Middle Way (see Buddhism).

Dharma

 

a Sanskrit word used in the ancient and medieval literature of India to express very varied concepts, including law, religion, obligation, justice, soul, and custom. Of all these concepts, the basic one is that which refers to the group of religious, moral, social, and family obligations placed on a human being by the laws and customs of his varna and caste. The observance of these precepts supposedly secures the successful transmigration of the soul or even the freeing of the soul from the influence of karma. In Buddhist literature the word dharma meant above all the teaching of Buddha.

Dharma

multi-faceted concept of morality, truth, doctrine. [Hindu Rel.: Parrinder, 77]

dharma

1. Hinduism social custom regarded as a religious and moral duty
2. Hinduism
a. the essential principle of the cosmos; natural law
b. conduct that conforms with this
3. Buddhism ideal truth as set forth in the teaching of Buddha
References in periodicals archive ?
Overtime, GTB, by violating all dharmic principles of running sound and honest banking business, advanced large amounts of loans to bull--(speculator-driven and stock market manipulator)--KP and his associated companies of questionable norms (practically every investment company of the KP group had an account at GTB and enjoyed generous funding by GTB) whose ways of doing business were: come what may, get rich too soon by loan diversion and misuse of sanctioned loans, manipulation, swindling and related unethical business practices.
Buddhists, as the shape of Buddhism, may attempt to comment on empty reality; but, in doing so qua Buddhists via buddhemic utterance, this would amount to yet another inscription of buddhistic decision--yet another turn on the circularity of the dharmic dispensation.
The sacrality arises from the maintenance of the dharmic order, so important and central to Hindu society.
generations 'I'll tell some dharmic tales as lessons to give to the younger generations.
Under colonial rule, caste--now defined by the dharmic idea of Varna, disembodied from former political contexts, and available as the principle object of colonial knowledge could take on a new and different form.
The specific intragroup difference was the endorsement of Dharmic values--an Asian Indian valuing of tradition and duty that was hypothesized to be related to lower congruence and less career exploration.
According to Rajadhyaksha, realist textures of the cinematic image in the 'all India film' largely remain 'formal' signatures of a degraded, fragmentary world continuously restored and reclaimed by a powerful mythic ontology of Being as Dharmic, or Being as Nation.
Smith is a long-time meditation practitioner and instructor; he encourages the use of Mudra practice for the contemporary warrior wishing to "face discord directly and 'create enlightened society'" and also asserts that "Mudra exercises rip us from our dharmic comfort zones and give us the zest we need to take on the forces of materialism that are leading us rapidly into a dark age" ("Rethinking Mudra").
The Sutra itself has thirty-two chapters, as if it were a stupa, a dharmic presence of the Buddha.
2) The chaos and disorder which dominates the core of Saathyia and many other popular Bombay films is, within the scope of Mishra's analysis, outside the dharmic law of the cinema, and by extension, popular Indian culture itself.
These two examples may be counted as traditions that have ventured onto a middle path: they did not give up their claim to being founded on a dharmic --and in the case of the Astamatrka, ritually effective--base; at the same time, they not only procured alternative operating funds, but also introduced newly adapted organisational and scheduling frameworks.
In fact, both texts define in clear terms what Dharma (moral obligation) is, and when and how a battle may and should be joined as a Dharmic (morally correct) battle or Jihad (holy war) carried out in submission to the will of God.