diacritic


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diacritic

A diacritic (or diacritical mark) is a mark added to a letter, usually to indicate a specific pronunciation of that letter.
Of the various languages using the Latin alphabet, English is one of the few that generally does not use diacritical marks. Those words that do contain them are typically foreign loanwords whose diacritics have been retained in English. The most common of these that appear in English are known as accents (either acute, as in café, or grave, as in vis-à-vis).
There are, however, a few diacritics that are used in native English words.
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diacritic

A small mark added to a letter that changes its pronunciation, such as an acute accent (á), a grave accent (à) and a cedilla (ç).
References in periodicals archive ?
It is for this reason that the text of the Holy Quran is fully vocalised, with all diacritics given and all vowels specified, so that it is read in one and only one way; no other text has this privilege.
In other words, the features of the head, diacritic and syntactic, percolate on the other constituents.
If that is the case, a diacritic should be added to the symbol: [??] (the [??] symbol referring to the lowered nature of the tongue and resulting sound).
"The problem with modern written Arabic is that often the diacritics (pronunciation accents) have been removed.
However, there is also ample evidence for the diacritic use of <CC> digraphs in Old English MSS.
That mark above the letter 'C' on Nikica Jelavic's jersey is a diacritic - a mark used to aid pronunciation and tell you that Jelavic should be pronounced Jelavitch, not Jelavick.
(Note that the apostrophe in English counts as a diacritic and not as a letter, in contrast to a language like Hawai'ian, in which the apostrophe is a letter indicating the presence of a distinct sound, i.e.
Microsoft's Character Design Standards is the only official and available resource for the diacritic design.
Ultimately, motion 95-M1 In principle the UTC is infavor of encoding additional diacritic combining characters for productive extension of the Arabic script failed to pass, and I do not think the committee is likely to reconsider this question now.
(2002.) Problems of diacritic design for Latin script text faces, Available from: http://www.sil.org/~gaultney/research.html, Accessed on: 2010-05-20
The latter demand also includes the writing of numerous Polish diacritic signs, which usually is avoided in official documents outside Poland.
People who specialize in some of them or live in those countries where they are located may provide very complete information, including proper diacritic marks, GPS data, old names etc.--and they do!!