diamond indenter

diamond indenter

[′dī·mənd in′den·tər]
(engineering)
An instrument that measures hardness by indenting a material with a diamond point.
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The minimum diameter that can be tested is 34 mm, but inside diameters as small as 22 mm can be tested using the optional 5-mm diamond indenter.
Minimum diameter is 34 mm, but inside diameters as small as 22 mm can be tested using the optional 5-mm diamond indenter. A color touch screen displays results of statistical calculations and graphic functions, which can be stored as text data.
S is the so-called unloading stiffness calculated for maximum indentation depth [h.sub.max]; F is the loading force and h is the indentation depth reached at the given loading force; [E.sub.i] is the Young's modulus and [v.sub.i] is the Poisson ratio of the diamond indenter and [E.sub.s] is the Young's modulus and [v.sub.s] is the Poisson ratio of the studied sample.
The sliding of a loaded diamond indenter on the coating is accompanied by plastic deformation of the substrate and pressing the indenter into the coating.
The Vickers hardness test procedure is commonly employed for small sections or thin components and is based on an optical measurement system.6 The micro hardness test method, ASTM E-384, recognizes a variety of light loads employing a square based pyramid shaped diamond indenter to form an indentation that is measured and mathematically converted into a hardness value using the formula,2 Psin (q/2)/ L2.7 Normally, loads range from a few grams to one or several kilograms.
The coating surface was intended with Vickers diamond indenter tip (triangular pyramid, a = 136[degrees]) under a gradually increasing normal load (typically 100 mN/ min) at a desired depth.
The Vickers hardness examination approach comprises of indenting the check material with a diamond indenter, as a correct pyramid with a quadrangle base with an edge of 136 degrees between opposite confronts subjected to a load of 30 kgf.
This instrument monitors and records the dynamic load and displacement of a three-sided pyramidal diamond indenter Berkovich tip with a radius of about 100 nm.
In an indentation experiment there are all the contact surfaces of diamond indenter in close contact with specimen, but in machining there are only about half.
Scratch tests were performed on the insulating coatings, operating both in progressive mode and at constant load (Micro-Combi, CSM Instruments, Peseux, Switzerland), using a Rounded Conical Rockwell C diamond indenter, with 100 [micro]m tip radius.
A common constant value of 0.15 for friction between the diamond indenter and metallic materials was used throughout this study; and large deformation FEM computation was performed.