diamond setter

diamond setter

[′dī·mənd ‚sed·ər]
(engineering)
A person skilled at setting diamonds by hand in a diamond bit or a bit mold.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Diamond Setter is a story of forbidden love and difficult histories that twists and turns through the vibrant city of Tel Aviv.
Moshe Sakal and Jessica Cohen (translator); THE DIAMOND SETTER; Other Press (Fiction: Translations) 15.95 ISBN: 9781590518915
HP's logo is encrusted with diamonds, each carefully placed by a diamond setter. Even the keyboard deck is plated in 18K gold to match the top cover and the power button is covered with diamonds for sparkling brilliance.
Organized by Soul Arch, a collective of young entrepreneurs with experience in marketing and communication, design, multimedia engineering and event production, the festival will host musicians, singers and bands such as the folk-rock band Postcards, the five-musician group Alif, alongside the musical and visual performers La Mirza and Rayess Bek, and singer-songwriter Kevork Keshishian, also known as Diamond Setter.
Diamond setter George Tandy at work in his Vyze Street room in July 1965.
The freelance diamond setter explained that he was sifting through "very valuable" New York City mud for tiny diamond and ruby chips, bits of platinum, white-gold industrial loops for jewelry assembly, and gold earring backs and loops from broken chains, watches, broaches and necklaces-all carelessly dropped.
Richardson worked as a diamond setter at Norton Company, Worcester for 19 years.
Together with his friend Diamond Setter, they set up their studio in Beirut and the pair are producing under the pseudonym Aisha.
The ring on offer (estimate: $15,000-20,000 / AED55,000-73,000)Aa took four months to produce and enlisted the services of a goldsmith, a sculptor, a painter and a diamond setter, focusing on a reverse intaglio back painted citrine.
She had worked as a diamond setter and was a dairy farmer in the Camp Creek area from 1950 to 1983.
The son of Jewish immigrants, George trained as a diamond setter, working for his father until 1975.
Early that morning he had struck diamond setter Elizabeth Jensen, 45, on the head with an ornamental beach stone from a fireplace and then strangled her.