diamond-ring effect

diamond-ring effect

A bright flash of sunlight from a conspicuous Baily's bead sometimes very briefly observed, together with the solar chromosphere, at the Moon's limb just before or after totality during a solar eclipse.

diamond-ring effect

[¦dī·mənd ′riŋ i‚fekt]
(astronomy)
A phenomenon observed just before and after the central phase of a total solar eclipse, in which the last Baily's bead glows brightly compared with other visible features, and the solar corona forms a band that is visible on the rest of the lunar edge.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Here's what puts all those in the shade: the diamond-ring effect that heralds a total solar eclipse, an explosion of light on the edge of the moon's inky circle, as it blots out the sun.
Next, the dazzling diamond-ring effect, as the last ray of sunlight shone through a valley on the Moon's surface, contrasting the lunar jewel with the still-faint solar corona forming the ring's band.
For a few minutes, bright planets and stars will come out in the midst of the sudden daytime darkness (bathed in the unearthly eclipse half-light), and such staggering marvels as the gleaming solar corona and (briefly) the diamond-ring effect will become visible.