Diamondback Moth


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Diamondback Moth

 

(Plutella maculipennis), a butterfly of the family Plutellidae, injurious to cruciferpus plants. Wing-span, 14–17 mm. The anterior wings are grayish or blackish brown with a wavy white stripe on the interior edge; the posterior wings are gray with a long fringe. The caterpillar is 9–12 mm long, spindle-shaped, and green. The eggs are pale yellow. The diamondback moth is distributed throughout the world. It does most damage to cabbage and rutabaga plants. There are between one and eight generations each year; the chrysalides winter on cruciferous weeds, stumps, and leaves. The moths emerge between April and June. One to three eggs are laid on the underside of leaves or on stems. The caterpillars first penetrate into the leaf tissue. They subsequently appear on the leaf surface, eating “little windows” in the leaves. Measures taken against the diamond-back moth include destruction of weeds, tillage of harvest remains, and treatment of plants with insecticides and the microbiological preparation entobacterin.

References in periodicals archive ?
Ecology of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) in Pakistan 1.
Sub-lethal effects of fenvalerate on the development, fecundity, and juvenile hormone esterase activity of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.).
Oxitec Ltd announced on Tuesday the start of field trials of its genetically engineered diamondback moth (DBM) following US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Finding Of No Significant Impact (FONSI) approval.
Pheromone-based integrated pest management to control the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella in cabbage fields.
The use of resistant cultivars is an alternative to insecticides that has assumed an important role in the management of diamondback moth (Lin et al.
According to Zhang's tests, methyl benzoate is 5 to 20 times more toxic to eggs of BMSB, diamondback moth, and tobacco hornworm than a conventional pyrethroid insecticide, a sulfur and pyrethrin mixture, and some organic products currently on the market.
Efficacy of certain bio-pesticides against the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) in cauliflower.
Rothamsted Research, in Hertfordshire, issued a warning that exceptionally high numbers of the diamondback moth are arriving in the UK, after reports from a network of moth traps around the country.
The diamondback moth (DBM) a.k.a Plutella xylostella (L.), is regarded as the most destructive insect pest of cabbages and other Brassica crops throughout the world [1].
One of the main pests affecting broccoli (Brassica oleracea) is the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus 1758; Lepidoptera: Plutellidae; Bertolaccini et al.
Resistance of Diamondback Moth (Lepidoptera; Plutellide) to Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies in the field.