diapir

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diapir

[′dī·ə‚pir]
(geology)
A dome or anticlinal fold in which a mobile plastic core has ruptured the more brittle overlying rock. Also known as diapiric fold; piercement dome; piercing fold.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
These models suggest that advective heat transport dominates in the early stages of diapirism when the salt-sediment interface dips at low angles and sediments are relatively uncompacted, retaining high porosity and permeability.
Because the type section was deposited on the flank of the Minudie Anticline, it may have occupied a subtle paleotopographic high that was inundated only by the largest flooding events or that was syndepositionally uplifted by diapirism as fluvial sediment prograded into the basin (Coleman 1988; Davison et al.
Tilted silt / Gravel beds, abrupt truncations, active salt diapirism and offset, indicating that deformation is continuing, even after the deposition of Recent and Sub- recent sediments.
Kockel, F.: 2003, Problems of diapirism in northern Germany (in Polish, English summary).
In the Bicorp Basin (Valencia province), where Miocene sedimentation was controlled by the diapirism of Triassic evaporites, Anadon et al.
Diapirism in the Gachsaran was introduced by O'Brien [19] to explain decoupling between the preand post-Gachsaran level.
Foliation developed during diapirism and ballooning would tend to concentrate along the margins of the pluton, which contrasts with the relatively uniform occurrence of foliation throughout the Main Zone.
The salt dome deposit is a specific geological structure with a terrain surface being affected by diapirism (uplift) and hydrogeological processes (subsidence).
Marsh, B.D., 1982, On the mechanisms of igneous diapirism, stoping and zone melting: American Journal of Science, v.
3) indicate the presence of salt diapirism in the mid-Aptian, mid-Turonian and early Maastrichtian (associated with movements on the "Nazare Fault").
We believe that the MZAMV developed and evolved in response to the continued compression within the Makran Acrretionary Belt, which in turn is a response of the subduction process; mud diapirism has also been an ongoing phenomenon since Pleistocene or even earlier.