diastolic pressure


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diastolic pressure

[¦dī·ə¦stäl·ik ′presh·ər]
(physiology)
The lowest arterial blood pressure during the cardiac cycle; reflects relaxation and dilation of a heart chamber.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pearson correlation analysis of ACR with different parameters of the two genders shows that ACR was positively correlated with age, systolic and diastolic pressure and negatively correlated with BMI and Height (cm) in female.
Table 2 shows the mean increase in systolic and diastolic pressure in females of both groups.
marmelos on aortic out flow, coronary effluent, cardiac output, dP/dt(max), dP/dt(min), systolic and diastolic pressure, heart rate and aortic pressure in isolated working rat heart
The treatment was well-tolerated by participants for the most part, although lower systolic and diastolic pressures have to be monitored based on other health concerns, and complications such as syncope, electrolyte abnormalities and acute kidney injury or renal failure were seen.
Tables 2-5 show the percentiles constructed for systolic pressure and diastolic pressure by gender, height, weight and BMI.
The change in diastolic pressure was calculated as the difference between the last value recorded in the opposite limb before the release of hand-grip pressure and the mean resting value obtained before starting the exercise ([DELTA][DBP.sub.IHG]).
Blood pressure is considered normal when the systolic pressure (the higher number) is less than 120 mmHg and the diastolic pressure (the lower number) is less than 80 mmHg.
At baseline, 3 months and 6 months, systolic and diastolic pressure and 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured.
From a baseline blood pressure of 126/71 mm Hg, diastolic pressure fell by 5 mm Hg in conjunction with consumption of the high-flavonol bar.
It is measured in millimetres of mercury (mmHg) and recorded as two figures: | The pressure of the blood when your heart beats to pump blood out (systolic pressure); | The pressure of the blood when your heart rests in between beats (diastolic pressure).
Pulse pressure (PP, the difference between systolic and diastolic pressure) has recently become an active area of discussion in the literature as an independent factor of cardiovascular risk.2,3 An increased pulse pressure nearly always indicated reduced vascular compliance of large arteries and, by definition, was always increased in patients with isolated systolic hypertension.
After the follow-up period of 16 weeks, it was noted that the those consuming fish oil-laced bread had 3.8 mm Hg lower systolic pressure (the top reading) and 2.6 mm Hg lower diastolic pressure (the bottom reading), compared to the placebo group.