diatomic


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diatomic

(of a compound or molecule)
a. containing two atoms
b. containing two characteristic groups or atoms
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

diatomic

[¦dī·ə′täm·ik]
(chemistry)
Consisting of two atoms.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The diatomic gas molecule's vibrational energy would be related to the absorption and/or emission of its surrounding blackbody/thermal radiation at temperature (T).
The vibration rotation energy of an electronic state of a diatomic molecule is commonly represented by [E.sub.vJ] = [E.sub.v] + [lambda][B.sub.v] + [[lambda].sup.2][D.sub.v] + [[lambda].sup.3][H.sub.v] + [[lambda].sup.4][L.sub.v] + [[lambda].sup.5][M.sub.v] ..., where [lambda] = J(J + 1), v and J are, respectively, the vibrational and rotational quantum numbers, [E.sub.v] is the pure vibrational energy, [B.sub.v] the rotational constant, and [D.sub.v], [H.sub.v], [L.sub.v] + ...
Sever, "Modified l-states of diatomic molecules subject to central potentials plus an angle-dependent potential," Journal of Mathematical Chemistry, vol.
Noble, "Breathers on diatomic Fermi-Pasta-Ulam lattices," Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena, vol.
Nitrogen is a diatomic molecule and the equivalence ratio of the mixture can be controlled without changing of the polytropic index.
It's caused by hot diatomic carbon ([C.sub.2]) fluorescing in the ultraviolet sunlight.
In this paper, we present an alternative proposal to the understanding and interpretation of the dipole moment of diatomic molecules, present content in the curriculum of physical chemistry and quantum chemistry disciplines in undergraduate chemistry courses.
Its involvement in so many biological processes, its simple diatomic structure and highly reactive nature enables it to form various complexes with other cellular components (Bogdan, 2001).