dichotomy


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Related to dichotomy: Dichotomy paradox

dichotomy

1. Logic the division of a class into two mutually exclusive subclasses
2. Botany a simple method of branching by repeated division into two equal parts
3. the phase of the moon, Venus, or Mercury when half of the disc is visible
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dichotomy

(dÿ-kot -ŏ-mee) The moment of exact half-phase of the Moon, Mercury, or Venus.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

dichotomy

[dī′käd·ə·mē]
(astronomy)
The phase of the moon or an inferior planet at which exactly half of its disk is illuminated and the terminator is a straight line.
(biology)
Divided in two parts.
Repeated branching or forking.
(computer science)
A division into two subordinate classes; for example, all white and all nonwhite, or all zero and all nonzero.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wade-Gayles writes, "The dichotomy of man's world and woman's place burns anger into Cleo's soul..." (159).
But the synthesis never `takes', the bridging exercise never actually abolishes the oppositional dichotomy; indeed, it is preserved.
This version of the dichotomy stresses insulation from politics by positing that elected officials cannot interfere with the administration or implementation of policy.
Although legislative control of administration is critical, he argued, "it is nevertheless important to remember that the administration cooperates indispensably with the legislature, and that without its assistance, the task of legislation would become much less informed and much less effective." These founding fathers of the field never advocated the dichotomy attributed to them--a conclusion demonstrated repeatedly (Golembiewski 1977; Rabin and Bowman 1984, 4; Rohr 1986, 31; Van Riper 1984, 209-10).(2) Still, the myth that public administration began as a narrow, confined, and insulated activity is regularly repeated partly because, as Lynn implies, it is self-satisfying to view ourselves as enlightened and to view earlier, particularly prewar scholars and practitioners, as benighted.
Foucault offers a perspective of the library experience that questions and dissolves the rational/irrational dichotomy that is the foundation of the positivist conception of the library.
Business schools have taught the importance of planning for years, but recent research points out a dichotomy between what these schools preach and what they and their communicators practice.
Nothing in this rigid win-loss dichotomy permits the notion that everyone could end up a beneficiary, that expansion rather than substitution might be possible, and that the favoring of multiple cultures is enhancement of the total rather than a sweepingly reflexive act of favoritism for anything other than the monolithic purity of an all-white nation."
Rather than accepting the rural and urban dichotomy, the authors raise questions about the nature of rural communities and examine the relationships that exist between rural and urban areas.
This dichotomy of opinion by two important programs of the AMA was not significant until the phrase "not on an investigational basis" was added to the handbook in 1991.
She drew attention to the dichotomy which exists between an idea and the expression of that idea as they relate to exclusive ownership, publication and reproduction rights.
According to his autobiographical essay Taiyo to tetsu (1968; translated as Sun and Steel , 1970), his lifelong concern was with the dichotomy between mind and body that he thought plagued modern civilization.
Every nation has one dichotomy or the other, if it is not the north/south, it is versus blocs or religious or even ideological dichotomies.